chemical weathering

chemical weathering

[′kem·i·kəl ′weth·ə·riŋ]
(geochemistry)
A weathering process whereby rocks and minerals are transformed into new, fairly stable chemical combinations by such chemical reactions as hydrolysis, oxidation, ion exchange, and solution. Also known as decay; decomposition.
References in periodicals archive ?
This will pave the way for the development of a new proxy of chemical weathering intensity applicable on a global scale and will serve to establish the European research area as a world leader in weathering processes.
The new data show clear chemical weathering trends, and clay accumulation at the expense of the mineral olivine, as expected in soils on Earth.
and co-authors found that chemical elements in the rocks indicate the particles were carried from their upstream source area to Yellowknife Bay and that most chemical weathering occurred after they were deposited.
Clay minerals, in general, are the resultant end-products of weathering and are therefore more resistant to chemical weathering than their parent materials (Jackson et al.
Especially vulnerable are karst landscapes, which scientists say are the result of chemical weathering and water shortages in carbon rock.
The laterite duricrust is a product of prolonged chemical weathering and forms by relative accumulation of Fe and A1 as more soluble components are lost from the weathering profile.
The Circle of Ancient Iranian Studies (CAIS) in Britain has said the dampness has caused chemical weathering that has brought corrosion and decay, caused the stone masonry walls to crack and gradually crumble.
Exposed to the surface environment for the first time, those crustal rocks reacted with air and water in a chemical weathering process that released ions such as calcium, iron, potassium, and silica into the oceans, changing the seawater chemistry.
The geological processes leading to the formation of clay REE deposits tend to be due to widespread chemical weathering of rare earth source rocks.
Chemical weathering occurs when the chemical nature of the minerals in rocks changes.
Simultaneously, erosion of rocks on the Indian subcontinent--in particular, the chemical weathering of a large amount of basaltic rocks formed from volcanic eruptions just a few million years earlier--consumed large volumes of C[O.

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