chemurgy


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chemurgy

(kĕm`ərjē), branch of applied chemistry concerned with preparing industrial products from agricultural raw materials. Among such products are plastics manufactured from casein and soybean; soaps derived from animal and vegetable fats; cellulose fiber products made from, for example, straws, stubble, cobs, and hulls; and starches derived from surplus grains. Chemurgy is a wide-ranging discipline involving chemistry, genetics, bacteriology, and physics.

chemurgy

[′ke·mər·jē]
(chemical engineering)
A branch of chemistry concerned with the profitable utilization of organic raw materials, especially agricultural products, for nonfood purposes such as for paints and varnishes.
References in periodicals archive ?
World War II effectively put an end to the chemurgy movement, including Ford's efforts to introduce large quantities of soy plastics into automobiles.
com), this undertaking, farm chemurgy, which involves using chemistry and other scientific processes to transform farm crops to industry products, is something that is being taken very seriously at Lear as they work toward more environmentally sound products and processes.
The special issue also features a look at the predecessor to today's efforts to make greater industrial use of agricultural crops and residues, the American chemurgy movement of the 1920s and 30s.
Erickson continued, "George Washington Carver is considered one of the founding fathers of the chemurgy movement, whose modern-day analog is industrial biotechnology.