Chenopodium

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Related to chenopod: goosefoot, Chenopodium
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goosefoot

goosefoot

Great source of food. A very wide family of plants found all over the world that taste like spinach, including quinoa, pigweed, Amaranth, lambsquarters.. Leaves taste like, and can be used to substitute domestic spinach in any recipe. One of the most nutritious delicious greens there is, even better than spinach. Used a long time ago by farmers to fatten up their livestock. The matt, light-green leaves resemble the shape of a goose foot and have a white, powdery underside. Stem tops are covered with tiny greenish yellow flowers that become seeds. The grain seeds are gluten free and can be used in soups, salads, stir fries, and can be used to replace wheat flour. There is no reason to go hungry when this amazing wild plant is around. Soak seeds in water for 8 hours. Seeds are ripe when they fall from the plant when shaken or rubbed. There are many different varieties of this amazing family, here are some... Lambsquarters C. album- both wide-leaf and narrow-leaf, Bluebushes(Australia), Strawberry Blite-C. capitatum, krouvida, ????ß?da (in Greece), Mexican Tea-C. ambrosiodides, Quelite(Mexico), California Goosefoot-C. californicum, Oak-leaved Goosefoot-C. glaucum, Upright Goosefoot C. urbicum, Maple Leaf Goosefoot-C. hybridum, C. simplex, Good King Henry-C. bonus-henricus , Many-seeded Goosefoot-C. polyspermum, Desert Goosefoot-C. pratericola. There is a variety in India called “Tree Spinach” C. giganteum with a magenta color in the center, that grows to 9 ft tall! (3m) and is totally edible. The Strawberry blite variety looks like it has what appears to be berries, but are actually tightly crinkled red flowers that taste like spinach. Some people may be allergic to Goosefoot pollen. Has oxalates, so people with kidney stones, rheumatism or arthritis should be cautious. TOXIC LOOKALIKE- Hairy Nightshade- is hairy (Lambsquarter is not) Doesn't have white powdery coating like lambs quarter. Hairy nightshade flowers are the biggest distinguishing factor- they are white and much bigger, as opposed to tiny greenish lambsquarters flowers. Another similar plant, the NettleLeaf Goosefoot (Chenopodium murale) , is considered by some to be toxic because of its high levels of oxalates, but other people are just fine with it, depending how healthy you are (no kidney problems or stones). This plant has somewhat shinier leaves, a reddish stem and it smells bad.

Chenopodium

 

(goosefoot), a genus of plants of the family Chenopodiaceae. They are annual or biennial herbs; they are sometimes subshrubs, shrubs, or, rarely, trees. The leaves are alternate. The flowers are mostly bisexual; sometimes there are some pistillate ones. The flowers are gathered into glomerules that form spicate or paniculate inflorescences. The perianth is two- to five-parted. The fruit is monospermous.

There are over 200 species of Chenopodium, distributed primarily in the temperate zone. Approximately 30 species, many of them weeds, are found in the USSR. Lamb’s-quarter (Chenopodium album), a weed used as cattle feed, is widely distributed. The leaves and young shoots of lamb’s-quarter and other species are used in salads and soups. The succulent red glomerules of strawberry goosefoot (C. foliosum) and strawberry blite (C. capitatum) are sometimes used as food and for coloring wine. Sowbane (C. hybridum) is poisonous to hogs. The species C. anthelminticum and Mexican tea (C ambrosioides) which are native to tropical America, are cultivated in the Ukraine and the Caucasus; they contain, primarily in the fruits, chenopodium oil, which is used as an anthelminthic. Quinoa (C. quinoa) is a high-altitude grain crop, raised mainly in Peru and Chile. The species C. purpurascens is cultivated as an ornamental.

REFERENCES

Kott, S. A. Sornye rasteniia i bor’ba s nimi, 3rd ed. Moscow, 1961.
Atlas lekarstvennykh rastenii SSSR. Moscow, 1962.

T. V. EGOROVA

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2]O, with a focus on the denitrification process and its controlling factors within a chenopod pattern ground system.
In such areas, chenopods could colonise the palaeovalley floors when saline groundwater levels were high, and later give way to woody species as watertables fell and after vadose-zone soils became flushed of resident salts and became more nutrient-rich following initial vegetation phases.
City foxes, although they consistently used urban (57% day, 54% night) and chenopod (25% day, 21% night) during the summer days and nights ([delta] = 5.
Given how widespread artificial waters have become throughout the chenopod and acacia rangelands, the results suggest that some 15-38% of species are at risk of declining substantially throughout these lands,' Landsberg says.
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Read JL (1999) The initial response of a chenopod shrubland plant and invertebrate community to two pulses of intensive cattle grazing.
Atriplex canescens is a woody chenopod shrub widely distributed in western North America (Freeman & McArthur, 1989).
On the rocky slopes there are small patches of shrubs such as Ephedra przewalskii (Ephedraceae), Gymnocarpos przewalskii (Caryophyllaceae), and several chenopods (mainly species of Sympegma and Anabasis) and Zygophyllum spp.
Many species of the grass, composite, crucifer, chenopod, poppy, and other families are annual ephemerals (some of them winter ephemerals) with a very short life cycle of only a month and a half or two months.
This is done by the saltbush Atriplex torreyi, a perennial chenopod shrub whose trunk is deeply grooved due to the separation of the cortical rays and the unequal growth of the cambium.
Unfortunately, they are only useful as grazing for camels, as sheep and goats eat just a few species of chenopod, the genera Corisper-mum, Bassia, Krascheninnikovia [=Eurotia], and Agriophyllum.
Thus, the chenopod Krascheninnikovia ceratoides grows in the Pamirs and reappears in several arid areas in Europe, for example, in the Monegros region of the Ebro Basin, the westernmost point in its distribution.