chervil


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chervil

(chûr`vəl), name for two similar edible Old World herbs of the family Umbelliferae (parsleyparsley,
Mediterranean aromatic herb (Petroselinum crispum or Apium petroselinum) of the carrot family, cultivated since the days of the Romans for its foliage, used in cookery as a seasoning and garnish.
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 family). The salad chervil is Anthriscus cerefolium. Its leaves, like those of the related dill and parsley, are used for seasoning. The turnip-rooted chervil (Chaerophyllum bulbosum) is cultivated for its edible root. Other species of Chaerophyllum [Gr.,=gladdening leaf, for the fragrant foliage] are also called chervil, e.g., the native American C. procumbens. Chervil is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Umbellales, family Umbelliferae.
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chervil

chervil

Not really a full umbrella, but has parsley-like leaves and white flowers. Flowers have anise-like flavor. Leaves used like parsley. Better to eat raw because heat takes away the flavor. Used as digestive aid, for high blood pressure, mild stimulant.

Chervil

 

(Chaerophyllum), a genus of plants of the family Umbelliferae. Chervils are biennial or perennial herbs with compound-pinnate incised leaves and small, white flowers (more rarely, purple, pink, or other shades), gathered into compound umbels. About 40 species grow in Europe, Asia, and America. In America there are several species. In the USSR there are more than 20 species, mainly in the Caucasus. Tuberous chervil (Chaerophyllum bulbosum), widespread in the European USSR, has edible, thickened, tuber-like roots. In Western Europe this species is cultivated. The roots of several other species are also edible. Intoxicating chervil (C. temulum or C. temulentum), which grows in the European USSR and the Caucasus, is considered a poisonous plant. Prescott chervil, or steppe chervil (C. prescottii), which is found in the European USSR, Siberia, and Middle Asia, and tuberous chervil are biennial weeds that choke newly planted cereal grains. Measures to control them include deep plowing, trimming the roots back as far as the carrot-like part, decontaminating the seeds, and spraying plantings with herbicides.

REFERENCES

Grossgeim, A. A. Rastitel’nye bogatstva Kavkaza, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1952.
Ipat’ev, A. N. Ovoshchnye rasteniia zemnogo shara. Minsk, 1966.

chervil

1. an aromatic umbelliferous Eurasian plant, Anthriscus cerefolium, with small white flowers and aniseed-flavoured leaves used as herbs in soups and salads
2. bur chervil a similar and related plant, Anthriscus caucalis
3. a related plant, Chaerophyllum temulentum, having a hairy purple-spotted stem
References in periodicals archive ?
To assemble the salad, season the bulgur wheat and add the vegetables, spring onions, beansprouts, mint, garlic and chervil, if using.
Finish the dish by mixing a little rocket leaves and chervil and placing them on each of your dishes.
Chervil is another winner for Dansili, who has had a fabulous week thanks to the victories of Rail Link and Strategic Prince.
Also, make another sowing of fennel, parsley, chervil, dill and so on, to maintain a good supply throughout the summer.
But to me, Barletta really piques more interest with such starter items as a neatly formed roasted eggplant and Spanish manchego cheese souffle nestled in a lively tomato marjoram sauce ($8), crispy cakes of Maine lobster risotto tinged with saffron in a chervil cream sauce ($10) and unusual nightly specials like sea bass ravioli.
With 14 homes already snapped up at Chervil Court, near Coulby Newham, since the site officially opened in April, sales adviser Sue Wright is confident another rush is imminent.
The range of cut herbs includes staples such as basil, parsley and coriander as well as more exotic varieties such as lemon thyme and chervil.
The range, which offers an alternative choice of cut for that 'hand-prepared' appearance, includes basil, chervil, chive, coriander, dill, oregano, parsley, peppermint, spearmint, provecal, tarragon and thyme.
Chervil tastes a bit like flat leaf parsley and aniseed.