Chesterfield

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Chesterfield,

city (1991 pop. 73,352) and district, Derbyshire, central England. An important industrial center, Chesterfield produces mining equipment, railroad cars, metal products, glass, and pottery. Of interest are the Stephenson Memorial Hall (named in honor of the inventor George StephensonStephenson, George,
1781–1848, British engineer, noted as a locomotive builder. He learned to read and write in night school at the age of 18, while working in a colliery.
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, who lived and is buried there), the 16th-century grammar school, and the 14th-century church with a twisted spire.

Chesterfield

1
Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield. 1694--1773, English statesman and writer, noted for his elegance, suavity, and wit; author of Letters to His Son (1774)

Chesterfield

2
an industrial town in N central England, in Derbyshire: famous 14th-century church with twisted spire. Pop.: 70 260 (2001)
References in classic literature ?
At the spot where we saw the last of the Dunlop tire it might equally have led to Holdernesse Hall, the stately towers of which rose some miles to our left, or to a low, gray village which lay in front of us and marked the position of the Chesterfield high road.
When, however, the dictionary was nearly done, Lord Chesterfield let it be known that he would be pleased to have it dedicated to him.
At the outset of the undertaking Johnson exerted himself to secure the patronage and financial aid of Lord Chesterfield, an elegant leader of fashion and of fashionable literature.
I was making for Chesterfield Walk," Mrs Verloc heard her husband's voice, "when I heard the bang.
They all take their tone from the Doctor; and he moves a very Chesterfield among the company.
Shakespeare was undoubtedly very fine in his way; Milton good, though prosy; Lord Bacon deep, and decidedly knowing; but the writer who should be his country's pride, is my Lord Chesterfield.
He was neither courtly, nor handsome, nor picturesque, in any respect; and yet his manner of accepting it, and of expressing his thanks without more words, had a grace in it that Lord Chesterfield could not have taught his son in a century.