chieftain

(redirected from chieftainship)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

chieftain

the head or leader of a tribe or clan
References in periodicals archive ?
The Kainai Chieftainship has a lengthy history and it was hard to narrow his focus to only 18 people in the 96-year history of the ceremony, he says.
After Seretse had renounced the chieftainship in 1956, Seretse and Ruth were allowed to return to Bechuanaland.
It was one of the pillars that upheld the chieftainship in traditional Mizo society; however, it was not practiced among all the Zo tribes.
At first sight, these familiar ideas of modern liberal democracy seem a long way from Dinka tradition with its emphasis on immortality--especially through the male line--polygyny, a non-monetary economy, divine chieftainship, and cattle.
It could include chieftainship, the tribal control of internal affairs, self-determination, Maori sovereignty, governance, independence, devolved state control, self-management, Maori nationalism, and, finally, tribal or pan-tribal self-management (p.
Hence he is deposed from the chieftainship in favour of Magwababa, Bhambada's uncle.
WHEN most young hacks land their first job in a newsroom, they know it will be a few decades of hard graft before they rise to the chieftainship of editor.
In 1956, Khama rescinded his claim to chieftainship and returned to Bechunaland.
In a nutshell: Fairly engrossing, tough-minded New Zealand family drama about a Maori girl who tries to learn boys-only chieftainship skills.
Earlier this month, the Civil Commissioner of Aweil West County, reported that approximately 50,000 women and children from his county have been enslaved, while a Paramount Chief from Aweil West County, Chief Riny Riny Lual, reported that an estimated 13,000 people from his chieftainship alone have been enslaved.
In Buffalo Point, the chieftainship is being passed from father to son.
The problem, as seen by Howitt and Fison, was that the Indigenous people did not yet possess sufficiently evolved institutions, such as chieftainship, which could be used by European administrators in the task of governing them.