chill


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chill

1. a feverish cold
2. a metal plate placed in a sand mould to accelerate cooling and control local grain growth

Chill

 

a sensation of cold that is caused by spasms of the superficial blood vessels. Chill is also accompanied by skin-muscle spasms, a phenomenon known as gooseflesh, and by muscle tremors, which arise mostly in the masticatory muscles and also in the muscles of the shoulder girdle, spine, and extremities. Chill often occurs as fever begins to rise in many pathological conditions, including traumas and infections. While experiencing chill, the body loses heat at a lower rate and produces heat at a higher rate; the increased heat production is due to muscle contraction, and after the body temperature rises, the chill usually ceases. Chill also occurs at the height of a fever if the body temperature fluctuates sharply.

Nervous, as opposed to physiological, chill is only a subjective sensation that occurs, for example, in neuroses. Chill is a normal protective reaction in response to exposure to cold. It can also occur in excitable persons under conditions of fear or agitation.

chill

[chil]
(metallurgy)
A metal plate inserted in the surface of a sand mold or placed in the mold cavity to rapidly cool and solidify the casting, producing a hard surface.
White or mottled iron occurring on the surface of a rapidly cooled gray iron casting.

CHILL

References in classic literature ?
A cold chill went to Tom's heart, he didn't know why; for he did not reflect that such words, from such an incongruous source, and so solemnly delivered, could not easily fail of that effect.
There was no voice of rebuke; but there were averted eyes; there was a silence and an air of solemnity that struck a chill to the culprit's heart.
Life was rather dull and dreary, however, and in the chill and gloom of November weather, with the vision of other people's turkeys bursting with fat, and other people's golden pumpkins and squashes and corn being garnered into barns, the young Simpsons groped about for some inexpensive form of excitement, and settled upon the selling of soap for a premium.
It was enough to chill the blood and stiffen the hair of an ordinary man to hear him talk.
Linton and his daughter would frequently walk out among the reapers; at the carrying of the last sheaves they stayed till dusk, and the evening happening to be chill and damp, my master caught a bad cold, that settled obstinately on his lungs, and confined him indoors throughout the whole of the winter, nearly without intermission.
He was not himself aware, nor was any one else, how he had caught the chill.
Involuntarily I looked round me, as I was accustomed to look round me when I went home; for, these mysterious words gave me a chill.
He stood and listened, and gazed for a long while--there was really something on the road coming towards him then, but he caught no sign of it; and the stillness and the wide trackless snow seemed to narrow his solitude, and touched his yearning with the chill of despair.
In fact, a chill tremor went through me as I realised that, to all intent, I was at length respectably settled down, with quite a considerable retrospect of happy married life.
It was still quite early, and the coldest morning that I think I ever was abroad in--a chill that pierced into the marrow.
But his master was not there; he was staying, it appeared, at the house in Murrayfield; and though the butler would have been glad enough to have taken his place and given all the news of the family, John, struck with a little chill, was eager to be gone.
Shrubs are gone, Withered the grass; all chill as the white rime Of early morn.