chimney

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chimney

1. Geology
a. a cylindrical body of an ore, which is usually oriented vertically
b. the vent of a volcano
2. Mountaineering a vertical fissure large enough for a person's body to enter

Chimney

A vertical noncombustible structure, containing one or more flues to carry smoke from the fireplaces to the outside, usually rising above the roof.

Chimney

 

a vertical pipe for discharging into the atmosphere gaseous products of fuel combustion from boiler units or industrial and space-heating furnaces.

In small central-heating boilers and furnaces chimneys are designed to create a natural draft, under the influence of which air for fuel combustion enters into the firebox and flue gases are discharged. In large boiler installations natural draft is replaced by a forced draft produced though flue gas pumps. Health standards require that the greater the hourly fuel consumption and the greater the ash and sulfur content, the higher the chimney must be. A chimney consists of a foundation, base, and shaft. The inner surface of the shaft is protected by a fire-resistant brick lining. Chimney sizes (height and diameter of the mouth) in the USSR have been standardized. Brick chimneys are made with heights up to 120 m and diameters of 0.75-8 m; reinforced-concrete chimneys are up to 300 m in height and 10 m in diameter; steel sheet chimneys (thickness of 3-15 mm) are not more than 40 m in height and 0.4-1 m in diameter.

What does it mean when you dream about a chimney?

Chimneys are often associated with cultural implications of Santa Claus arriving to reward those who have been good with gifts. They also symbolize the warmth and cheer of family as in the traditional “home-sweet-home” scene on the front of greeting cards, gifts of candies, and food and homemade items of every description featuring the smoking brick chimney.

chimney

[′chim‚nē]
(building construction)
A vertical, hollow structure of masonry, steel, or concrete, built to convey gaseous products of combustion from a building.
(electronics)
A pipelike enclosure that is placed over a heat sink to improve natural upward convection of heat and thereby increase the dissipating ability of the sink.
(geology)

Chimney

A vertical hollow structure of masonry, steel, or reinforced concrete, built to convey gaseous products of combustion from a building or process facility. A chimney should be high enough to furnish adequate draft and to discharge the products of combustion without causing local air pollution. The height and diameter of a chimney determine the draft. For adequate draft, small industrial boilers and home heating systems depend entirely upon the enclosed column of hot gas. In contrast, stacks, which are chimneys for large power plants and process facilities, usually depend upon force-draft fans and induced-draft fans to produce the draft necessary for operation, and the chimney is used only for removal of the flue gas. See Fan

For fire safety, chimneys for residential construction and for small buildings must extend at least 3 ft (0.9 m) above the level where they pass through the roof and at least 2 ft (0.6 m) higher than any ridge within 10 ft (3 m) of them. Some stacks extend as high as 500 ft (150 m) above ground level, thus providing supplementary natural draft.

A chimney or stack must be designed to withstand lateral loads from wind pressure or seismic forces (earthquakes), as well as vertical loads from its own weight. Small chimneys used in residential construction are commonly made of brick or unreinforced masonry, while stacks are usually made of steel. Tall steel chimneys of small diameter cannot economically be made self-supporting and must be guyed. Concrete chimneys may be plain or reinforced. Except for rectangular flues and chimneys commonly used in residential construction, masonry chimneys are usually constructed of perforated radial brick molded to suit the diameter of the chimney. See Brick, Loads, dynamic, Masonry, Mortar, Reinforced concrete, Truss

chimney

chimney
An incombustible vertical structure containing one or more flues to provide draft for fireplaces, and to carry off gaseous products of combustion to the outside air from fireplaces, furnaces, or boilers. Also see clay-and-sticks
References in classic literature ?
The evening with which we have to do, was neither a summer nor an autumn one, but the twilight of a day in March, when the wind howled dismally among the bare branches of the trees, and rumbling in the wide chimneys and driving the rain against the windows of the Maypole Inn, gave such of its frequenters as chanced to be there at the moment an undeniable reason for prolonging their stay, and caused the landlord to prophesy that the night would certainly clear at eleven o'clock precisely,--which by a remarkable coincidence was the hour at which he always closed his house.
There is iron-dust on everything; and the smoke is seen through the windows rolling heavily out of the tall chimneys to mingle with the smoke from a vaporous Babylon of other chimneys.
Roused into new strength and energy, and stimulated by the noise within the house which announced that an entrance had really been effected, he set his foot against the stack of chimneys, fastened one end of the rope tightly and firmly round it, and with the other made a strong running noose by the aid of his hands and teeth almost in a second.
The whole of one side of the laboratory was taken up with a large chimney, crucibles, ovens, and such implements as are needed for chemical experiments; tables, loaded with phials, papers, reports, an electrical machine,--an apparatus, as Monsieur Darzac informed me, employed by Professor Stangerson to demonstrate the Dissociation of Matter under the action of solar light--and other scientific implements.
The fact that it had been thrust up the chimney would sufficiently account for these appearances.
He looked about for a nice convenient place, and he fixed upon the chimney.
The brigadier sent for some sticks and straw, and having filled the chimney with them, set a light to it.
The little house was so pleased to have such a capital chimney that, as if to say thank you, smoke immediately began to come out of the hat.
He, however, was careless of the peril, but as wild and restless as the night itself, or as the flame that quivered up the chimney at each roar of the tempestuous wind.
When the villagers were lighting their fires beyond the horizon, I too gave notice to the various wild inhabitants of Walden vale, by a smoky streamer from my chimney, that I was awake.
Pickwick--hands across--down the middle to the very end of the room, and half-way up the chimney, back again to the door-- poussette everywhere--loud stamp on the ground--ready for the next couple--off again--all the figure over once more--another stamp to beat out the time--next couple, and the next, and the next again--never was such going; at last, after they had reached the bottom of the dance, and full fourteen couple after the old lady had retired in an exhausted state, and the clergyman's wife had been substituted in her stead, did that gentleman, when there was no demand whatever on his exertions, keep perpetually dancing in his place, to keep time to the music, smiling on his partner all the while with a blandness of demeanour which baffles all description.
Let us carry the body on the roof of the house and lower it down the chimney of our neighbour the Mussulman.