chimney

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chimney

1. Geology
a. a cylindrical body of an ore, which is usually oriented vertically
b. the vent of a volcano
2. Mountaineering a vertical fissure large enough for a person's body to enter

Chimney

A vertical noncombustible structure, containing one or more flues to carry smoke from the fireplaces to the outside, usually rising above the roof.

Chimney

 

a vertical pipe for discharging into the atmosphere gaseous products of fuel combustion from boiler units or industrial and space-heating furnaces.

In small central-heating boilers and furnaces chimneys are designed to create a natural draft, under the influence of which air for fuel combustion enters into the firebox and flue gases are discharged. In large boiler installations natural draft is replaced by a forced draft produced though flue gas pumps. Health standards require that the greater the hourly fuel consumption and the greater the ash and sulfur content, the higher the chimney must be. A chimney consists of a foundation, base, and shaft. The inner surface of the shaft is protected by a fire-resistant brick lining. Chimney sizes (height and diameter of the mouth) in the USSR have been standardized. Brick chimneys are made with heights up to 120 m and diameters of 0.75-8 m; reinforced-concrete chimneys are up to 300 m in height and 10 m in diameter; steel sheet chimneys (thickness of 3-15 mm) are not more than 40 m in height and 0.4-1 m in diameter.

What does it mean when you dream about a chimney?

Chimneys are often associated with cultural implications of Santa Claus arriving to reward those who have been good with gifts. They also symbolize the warmth and cheer of family as in the traditional “home-sweet-home” scene on the front of greeting cards, gifts of candies, and food and homemade items of every description featuring the smoking brick chimney.

chimney

[′chim‚nē]
(building construction)
A vertical, hollow structure of masonry, steel, or concrete, built to convey gaseous products of combustion from a building.
(electronics)
A pipelike enclosure that is placed over a heat sink to improve natural upward convection of heat and thereby increase the dissipating ability of the sink.
(geology)

Chimney

A vertical hollow structure of masonry, steel, or reinforced concrete, built to convey gaseous products of combustion from a building or process facility. A chimney should be high enough to furnish adequate draft and to discharge the products of combustion without causing local air pollution. The height and diameter of a chimney determine the draft. For adequate draft, small industrial boilers and home heating systems depend entirely upon the enclosed column of hot gas. In contrast, stacks, which are chimneys for large power plants and process facilities, usually depend upon force-draft fans and induced-draft fans to produce the draft necessary for operation, and the chimney is used only for removal of the flue gas. See Fan

For fire safety, chimneys for residential construction and for small buildings must extend at least 3 ft (0.9 m) above the level where they pass through the roof and at least 2 ft (0.6 m) higher than any ridge within 10 ft (3 m) of them. Some stacks extend as high as 500 ft (150 m) above ground level, thus providing supplementary natural draft.

A chimney or stack must be designed to withstand lateral loads from wind pressure or seismic forces (earthquakes), as well as vertical loads from its own weight. Small chimneys used in residential construction are commonly made of brick or unreinforced masonry, while stacks are usually made of steel. Tall steel chimneys of small diameter cannot economically be made self-supporting and must be guyed. Concrete chimneys may be plain or reinforced. Except for rectangular flues and chimneys commonly used in residential construction, masonry chimneys are usually constructed of perforated radial brick molded to suit the diameter of the chimney. See Brick, Loads, dynamic, Masonry, Mortar, Reinforced concrete, Truss

chimney

chimney
An incombustible vertical structure containing one or more flues to provide draft for fireplaces, and to carry off gaseous products of combustion to the outside air from fireplaces, furnaces, or boilers. Also see clay-and-sticks
References in classic literature ?
Beyond this dump there stood a great brickyard, with smoking chimneys.
A blue smoke went curling up from the chimney, and was almost the pleasantest part of the spectacle to Ulysses.
Then, on the slight turn of the Lower Hope Reach, clusters of factory chimneys come distinctly into view, tall and slender above the squat ranges of cement works in Grays and Greenhithe.
They will soon be in the parish of Hayslope; the grey church-tower and village roofs lie before them to the left, and farther on, to the right, they can just see the chimneys of the Hall Farm.
The autumn sun, rising over the shire hills, disclosed a pleasant country; woods brown and mellow varied the fields from which the harvest had been lately carried; a river, gliding between the woods, caught on its surface the somewhat cold gleam of the October sun and sky; at frequent intervals along the banks of the river, tall, cylindrical chimneys, almost like slender round towers, indicated the factories which the trees half concealed; here and there mansions, similar to Crimsworth Hall, occupied agreeable sites on the hill-side; the country wore, on the whole, a cheerful, active, fertile look.
At one end, and just on the river bank, was a ruined building, little better than a heap of rubbish, with a stack of chimneys rising like a solitary tower out of the center.
Several witnesses, recalled, here testified that the chimneys of all the rooms on the fourth story were too narrow to admit the passage of a human being.
The Judge was roused from his reflections, when he saw the four columns of smoke which floated above his own chimneys.
He is liable for direct damage both to your chimneys and any collateral damage caused by fall of bricks into garden, etc.
As he comes into the iron country farther north, such fresh green woods as those of Chesney Wold are left behind; and coal pits and ashes, high chimneys and red bricks, blighted verdure, scorching fires, and a heavy never-lightening cloud of smoke become the features of the scenery.
He was very respectful, exceedingly respectful, when he declared, as you were a witness to; still at the same time, if I am to be persecuted in this way, if vegetable what's-his-names and all kinds of garden-stuff are to strew my path out of doors, and gentlemen are to come choking up our chimneys at home, I really don't know--upon my word I do NOT know--what is to become of me.
At daybreak the 1,200 chimneys vomited their torrents of flame into the air, and the ground was agitated with dull tremblings.