chinoiserie


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

chinoiserie

(shēnwäzrē`), decorative work produced under the influence of Chinese art, applied particularly to the more fanciful and extravagant manifestations. Intimations of Eastern art reached Europe in the Middle Ages in the porcelains brought by returning travelers. Eastern trade was maintained during the intervening centuries, and the East India trading companies of the 17th and 18th cent. imported Chinese lacquers and porcelains. Dutch ceramics quickly showed the influence of Chinese blue-and-white porcelains. In the middle of the 18th cent. the enthusiasm for Chinese objects affected practically every decorative art applied to interiors, furniture, tapestries, and bibelots and supplied artisans with fanciful motifs of scenery, human figures, pagodas, intricate lattices, and exotic birds and flowers. In France the Louis XV style gave especial opportunities to chinoiserie, as it blended well with the established rococorococo
, style in architecture, especially in interiors and the decorative arts, which originated in France and was widely used in Europe in the 18th cent. The term may be derived from the French words rocaille and coquille
..... Click the link for more information.
. Whole rooms, such as those at Chantilly, were painted with compositions in chinoiserie, and Watteau and other artists brought consummate craftsmanship to the style. Thomas Chippendale, the chief exponent in England, produced a unique and decorative type of furniture. The craze early reached the American colonies. Chinese objects, particularly fine wallpapers, played an important role in the adornment of rooms, and especially in Philadelphia the style had a pronounced effect upon design.

Bibliography

See study by H. Honour (1961).

Chinoiserie

A Western style of architecture and decoration, utilizing Chinese design elements.

chinoiserie

A Western European and English architectural and decorative fashion employing Chinese ornamentation and structural elements, particularly in 18th cent. Rococo design.

chinoiserie

1. a style of decorative or fine art based on imitations of Chinese motifs
2. an object or objects in this style
References in periodicals archive ?
10) Perhaps no surprise to Craig, who was no longer interested in Asian theatre in the 1930s, Hsiung's play impressed the young Northrop Frye, who saw it in London in 1936, as "a very slickly tailored piece of chinoiserie," which the future renowned Canadian literary critic, who had never seen a real Chinese play produced in China, believed was "ridiculous" to "anyone who had seen a real Chinese play produced under authentically Chinese conditions.
This George III tavern clock by Abraham Bernard of Bristol in about 1760 has a black lacquered case with chinoiserie decoration
It is unlike other chinoiserie decoration found on European porcelain but there is only one example that directly copies a Chinese source (see Selma Schwartz, Apollo, September 2012).
He said: "In the 17th century the Chinoiserie style was in high fashion, combining the beauty of ancient China with the best of western civilisation.
The 'I Love Paris' menu will feature classic French staples: brioche, macaroons and mini eclairs, all of which Eric Lanlard has elegantly re-invented to bring a touch of Parisian chic to Chinoiserie.
Jumeirah Carlton Tower has 216 rooms and suites, all individually styled with a calm and contemporary feel, together with The Rib Room Bar & Restaurant, GILT Cocktail Lounge, Chinoiserie and The Club Room.
Each has a chinoiserie island design with two figures.
Accompanying this piece is a rare and unusual rosewood cabinet on stand, in the Chinoiserie taste, probably from the court of Augustus in Dresden, circa 1750.
His more fancied contender was Celestial Storm, but he also had Chinoiserie in the race.
Wallace, who studied Chinese music on site to prepare this commission, devised his own kind of chinoiserie.
From the fluid linear motifs and delicate patterns on Chinese porcelain wares, the aristocracy of Europe developed its taste for chinoiserie, a whimsical, fantasising and largely unprecedented style of decoration that reached the peak of its popularity in the mid-18th century.
The compact entry space, featuring two ottomans upholstered in quilted chinoiserie toile, is another example of her perfectly calibrated eye.