Chionodoxa

(redirected from chionodoxas)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Chionodoxa

 

(glory-of-the-snow), a genus of bulbous plants of the family Liliaceae. The leaves are radical and linear, and the flowers are in few-flowered racemes with low, leafless pedicels. The lobes of the perianth are fused at the base; the bell-shaped to funnel-shaped (or almost stellate) perianth is blue-violet, blue-purple (sometimes with an eyelet), blue, white, or pink (in cultivated forms). The stamens are free. Flowering occurs in early spring. There are about six species, found in Asia Minor and on the islands of the Eastern Mediterranean in mountains at elevations to 2,000 m. All species are decorative; most frequently cultivated is the species C. luciliae and its varieties.

References in periodicals archive ?
This is great news as there's not a better colour to blend with the blue star-shaped flowers of both Scilla and Chionodoxas.
The early spring tubular flowers come in various colours from pink to crimson and blue and are not only delightful for us to enjoy, particularly if they are planted in amongst dwarf narcissi, scillas, chionodoxas and wood anemones in a woodland garden setting, but they are a very important source of pollen and nectar for our queen Bumble bees when they emerge from hibernation in March.
A I'm very keen on gardening with bbulbs, specially the small spring bulbs like scillas, anemones, chionodoxas and miniature narcissi.
Puschkinias are closely related to Scillas, including our wild bluebell, and Chionodoxas and, to get a really delightful springtime display, mix these together in an open sunny or partially shaded spot.
Chionodoxas originate from the Eastern Mediterranean and have a preference for a well-drained soil in full sun where they will seed themselves around over the years, forming a carpet of leaves and flowers in spring but disappearing below soil level completely by early summer.
Chionodoxa, the Glory of the Snow and Scilla, the Squill, both belong to the Hyacinthaceae/Liliaceaea family and, in flower over the next month to six weeks, they will appear to be tiny, thinly clustered Hyacinth flowers, although few of them provide the overpowering scent of the typical Hyacinth.