chisel

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chisel

a. a hand tool for working wood, consisting of a flat steel blade with a cutting edge attached to a handle of wood, plastic, etc. It is either struck with a mallet or used by hand
b. a similar tool without a handle for working stone or metal

Chisel

 

(in Russian, doloto, also drill bit), a manual or machine woodworking tool for hollowing out openings, recesses, grooves, and so on. Hollow chisels with a drill inside are used in drilling and mortising machines. Chisels are also used for carving bone and other materials. Flint chisels began to be used in the Upper Paleolithic and bronze chisels, in Egypt and Mesopotamia during the third millennium B.C.; iron chisels were used in the ninth and eighth centuries B.C. In Russia steel chisels with cutting edges of standard dimensions were already being used during the tenth to 13th centuries A.D.

chisel

[′chiz·əl]
(agriculture)
A strong, heavy tool with curved points used for tilling; drawn by a tractor, it stirs the soil at an appreciable depth without turning it.
(design engineering)
A tool for working the surface of various materials, consisting of a metal bar with a sharp edge at one end and often driven by a mallet.

Chisel

[′chiz·əl]
(astronomy)

chisel

chisel
A hand tool with a cutting edge on one end of a metal blade (usually steel); used in dressing, shaping, or working wood, stone, metal, etc.; usually driven with a hammer or mallet. Also see cold chisel and wood chisel.

CHISEL

(language)
An extension of C for VLSI design, implemented as a C preprocessor. It produces CIF as output.

["CHISEL - An Extension to the Programming language C for VLSI Layout", K. Karplus, PHD Thesis, Stanford U, 1982].
References in classic literature ?
We did break the thing up at length with the aid of a chisel, but it was perfectly impossible to eat it, and we had to make a dinner off the vegetables and an apple tart.
Snagsby whether he means Carrots, or the Colonel, or Gallows, or Young Chisel, or Terrier Tip, or Lanky, or the Brick.
Greece crowned her mountains with a temple harmonious to the eye; India disembowelled hers, to chisel therein those monstrous subterranean pagodas, borne up by gigantic rows of granite elephants.
The ruggedness of the head, which looked as though it were carved from a stone refractory to the sculptor's chisel, the rough mane of dark hair, the great nose, and the massive bones of the jaw, suggested a man of strength; and yet Philip wondered whether perhaps the mask concealed a strange weakness.
After a few more turns of the lathe he removed his foot from the pedal, wiped his chisel, dropped it into a leather pouch attached to the lathe, and, approaching the table, summoned his daughter.
Fine masonry, without mortar or cutting chisel, they builded to withstand the ocean surge.
though exceedingly fractured, yet remained standing; but the vast buttresses (at right angles to them, and therefore parallel to the walls that fell) were in many cases cut clean off, as if by a chisel, and hurled to the ground.
But you can cut off a vine-branch with a dagger or with a chisel, and in many other ways?
Now that which is inevitable in the work has a higher charm than individual talent can ever give, inasmuch as the artist's pen or chisel seems to have been held and guided by a gigantic hand to inscribe a line in the history of the human race.
The old tragic Necessity, which lowers on the brows even of the Venuses and the Cupids of the antique, and furnishes the sole apology for the intrusion of such anomalous figures into nature,--namely, that they were inevitable; that the artist was drunk with a passion for form which he could not resist, and which vented itself in these fine extravagances,--no longer dignifies the chisel or the pencil.
The Doctor looked up from his task; he was working away with a great chisel at the bottom of a boy's sailing boat, the lines of which he was no doubt fashioning on the model of one of Nicias's galleys.
Well, my little fellows," began the Doctor, drawing himself up with his back to the fire, the chisel in one hand and his coat- tails in the other, and his eyes twinkling as he looked them over; "what makes you so late?