chitinase


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chitinase

[′kīt·ən‚ās]
(biochemistry)
An externally secreted digestive enzyme produced by certain microorganisms and invertebrates that hydrolyzes chitin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Olander LP, Vitousek PM (2000) Regulation of soil phosphatase and chitinase activity by N and P availability.
Later, the enzyme chitinase was identified by mass spectrometry in the drops of W.
and other bacteria in the chitinase and chitobiase activities of the crystalline style of Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin).
Functional variants in the promoter region of Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) and susceptibility to schizophrenia.
This separation suggest that the reduce of the disease isn't be to a direct effect of Fo47 on Forl12 (nutrient competition and root colonization) only, but pass by the plant [18,1], where the induction of a local resistance that can be translate by the cytological modifications (elaboration of structural barriers and formation of cell wall thickenings) [11] or the augmentation chitinase, glucanase and glucosidase activity in the treated plant [21, 10,19, 12].
Additionally, leaves were collected for phytochemical analysis including trypsin inhibitor, chitinase, and nitrogen concentrations.
Gut chitinase has been detected qualitatively in a few termite species (Noirot & Noirot-Timothee 1969; Mishra & Sen-Sarma 1981) but not in others (Mishra & Sen-Sarma 1981).
Human cartilage gp-39, a major secretory product of articular chondrocytes and synovial cells, is a mammalian member of a chitinase protein family.
To find evidence of those good genetic recombinations, Hersch-Green and her team sequenced the gene chitinase (pronounced KIE-tin-ace) A in each of the 32 species.
Combining beta-gluconase and chitinase with cellulase makes an enzyme formulation with powerful anticandidal biofilm activity.
0% were pectinase positive and all were chitinase negative.
Recognized by human and environmental enzymes such as lisozyme, chitinase, acetyl-glucosaminidase and lipases, chitin is easily transformed to oligomers and/ or reduced to glucose and glutamic acid.