antiseptic

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antiseptic,

agent that kills or inhibits the growth of microorganisms on the external surfaces of the body. Antiseptics should generally be distinguished from drugs such as antibiotics that destroy microorganisms internally, and from disinfectants, which destroy microorganisms found on nonliving objects. Germicides include only those antiseptics that kill microorganisms. Some common antiseptics are alcohol, iodine, hydrogen peroxide, and boric acid. There is great variation in the ability of antiseptics to destroy microorganisms and in their effect on living tissue. For example, mercuric chloride is a powerful antiseptic, but it irritates delicate tissue. In contrast, silver nitrate kills fewer germs but can be used on the delicate tissues of the eyes and throat. There is also a great difference in the time required for different antiseptics to work. Iodine, one of the fastest-working antiseptics, kills bacteria within 30 sec. Other antiseptics have slower, more residual action. Since so much variability exists, systems have been devised for measuring the action of an antiseptic against certain standards. The bacteriostatic action of an antiseptic compared to that of phenol (under the same conditions and against the same microorganism) is known as its phenol coefficient. Joseph Lister was the first to employ the antiseptic phenol, or carbolic acid, in surgery, following the discovery by Louis Pasteur that microorganisms are the cause of infections. Modern surgical techniques for avoiding infection are founded on asepsis, the absence of pathogenic organisms. Sterilization is the chief means of achieving asepsis.

antiseptic

[¦an·tə¦sep·tik]
(microbiology)
A substance used to destroy or prevent the growth of infectious microorganisms on or in the human or animal body.

antiseptic

an agent or substance that prevents infection by killing germs
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Therefore, the guideline recommends chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine as skin decontaminants on neonates, but proposes that the solutions be removed with sterile saline solution or water (instead of alcohol preps) to prevent absorption.
In its Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections (2011), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends numerous products containing chlorhexidine as evidence-based interventions that may prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs).
5% chlorhexidine gluconate solution; for women in the control group, external genitalia were wiped with autoclaved tap water.
Preoperative baths using chlorhexidine have been advocated to reduce postoperative wound infection.
Chlorhexidine has been shown to be an effective agent in plaque inhibition (Loe et al 1976) because it is well retained in the oral cavity, reacting reversibly with receptors in the mouth due to its affinity for hydroxyapetite and acidic salivary protein (Rolla, Loe and Schiott 1970).
Three agents currently used in clinical practices are reviewed in this paper: doxycycline gel, chlorhexidine chip and minocycline microspheres.
mutans colony counts after rinsing with chlorhexidine and with green tea were almost identical.
Other papers have commented on the need for neutralization of the chlorhexidine before plating (Kampf, 2008, 2009; Kampf, Hoffer, & Ruden, 1998; Kampf, Shaffer, & Hunte, 2005; Reichel, Heisig, & Kampf, 2008), but we were unable to demonstrate any residual antimicrobial effect from either cleaning agent when compared with the control (study 4).
com/research/k3d7sn/surface) has announced the addition of the "Surface Disinfectant Market by Product (Hypochlorite, Quaternary Ammonium Compounds, Hydrogen Peroxide, Chlorhexidine Gluconate, Peracetic Acid, Phenol, Alcohol), Formulation (Sprays, Liquids, Wipes) - Global Forecast to 2020 " report to their offering.
16) In comparing three traditional types of scrub, both alcohol and chlorhexidine have proved to be more potent than povidone-iodine scrubs in reducing CFUs.
Researchers at Technische Universitat Munchen have focused on the development of a slow-release antimicrobial coating for suture materials based on the antibacterial agent chlorhexidine, which is an established oral antiseptic.
A difference in salivary MS levels measured in different days within the same treatment group was only verified with LSO toothpaste, chlorhexidine gel and chlorhexidine mouthwash.