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1 A group of singers; traditionally the chorus organized to sing in a church. Usually, Roman Catholic, Anglican, and Lutheran choirs are composed of men and boys, but occasionally in these churches and customarily in other Protestant churches men and women form the choir.

2 That division of an organ usually used to accompany the singers, played from the lowest manual on the console.

3 A section of a chorus or orchestra, as the contrasted choirs of polychoral music, or brass choir, woodwind choir.

4 That part of a church reserved for the singers and the officiating clergy in a cathedral or abbey; the same area in a parish church is the chancel: see stallstall,
small division of a larger space, sometimes partly partitioned. The term is used for a booth for display and selling at an exhibition, for a compartment in a stable or kennel, or, in England, for the forward seats in a theater orchestra.
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That part of a church where the religious service isaccompanied by singing, usually part of the chancel and often separated by an ornamental screen.


That part of a church, between the sanctuary and the nave, usually occupied by a group of singers.


1. an organized group of singers, esp for singing in church services
a. the part of a cathedral, abbey, or church in front of the altar, lined on both sides with benches, and used by the choir and clergy
b. (as modifier): choir stalls
3. a number of instruments of the same family playing together
4. one of the manuals on an organ controlling a set of soft sweet-toned pipes
5. any of the nine orders of angels in medieval angelology
References in classic literature ?
Well," says I, "I reckon I ought to be ashamed of myself, but the fact is I left them laying around that day I resigned from the choir.
But there's people set up their own ears for a standard, and expect the whole choir to follow
George's, Edinburgh,' which bears the name, and was first sung in the choir of that church.
Porthos, seeing this, retwisted his mustache, elongated his imperial a second time, and began to make signals to a beautiful lady who was near the choir, and who not only was a beautiful lady, but still further, no doubt, a great lady--for she had behind her a Negro boy who had brought the cushion on which she knelt, and a female servant who held the emblazoned bag in which was placed the book from which she read the Mass.
Monsieur Bourais hid part of the choir from view, but directly in front of her, the flock of maidens, wearing white wreaths over their lowered veils, formed a snow-white field, and she recognised her darling by the slenderness of her neck and her devout attitude.
said he, "come here: so thou hast changed thy trade; thou art no longer a choir boy nor a tavern boy; thou hast become a horse stealer?
Blick before Your Reverence come into the parish, and been at the ringin' o' every bell, and the diggin' o' every grave, and sung i' the choir long afore Bartle Massey come from nobody knows where, wi' his counter-singin' and fine anthems, as puts everybody out but himself--one takin' it up after another like sheep a-bleatin' i' th' fold.
They could see little more than the choir boys in the chancel, but to the roots of the hair of their necks they felt the congregation behind mercilessly devouring them by look.
He knew the tune; it was a familiar one in the choir of the village meeting-house.
And they say (the starry choir And all the listening things) That Israfeli's fire Is owing to that lyre By which he sits and sings - The trembling living wire Of those unusual strings.
Here they were within a plantation which formed the Abbey grounds, and taking a new hold of her he went onward a few steps till they reached the ruined choir of the Abbey-church.
Eliza Spears was wasting away with kidney trouble before she went to him, and now she's up and around, and singing in the choir.