choir

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choir

[O.Fr.] 1 A group of singers; traditionally the chorus organized to sing in a church. Usually, Roman Catholic, Anglican, and Lutheran choirs are composed of men and boys, but occasionally in these churches and customarily in other Protestant churches men and women form the choir. 2 That division of an organ usually used to accompany the singers, played from the lowest manual on the console. 3 A section of a chorus or orchestra, as the contrasted choirs of polychoral music, or brass choir, woodwind choir. 4 That part of a church reserved for the singers and the officiating clergy in a cathedral or abbey; the same area in a parish church is the chancel: see stallstall,
small division of a larger space, sometimes partly partitioned. The term is used for a booth for display and selling at an exhibition, for a compartment in a stable or kennel, or, in England, for the forward seats in a theater orchestra.
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Choir

That part of a church where the religious service isaccompanied by singing, usually part of the chancel and often separated by an ornamental screen.

choir

choir
That part of a church, between the sanctuary and the nave, usually occupied by a group of singers.

choir

1. an organized group of singers, esp for singing in church services
2. 
a. the part of a cathedral, abbey, or church in front of the altar, lined on both sides with benches, and used by the choir and clergy
b. (as modifier): choir stalls
3. a number of instruments of the same family playing together
4. one of the manuals on an organ controlling a set of soft sweet-toned pipes
5. any of the nine orders of angels in medieval angelology
References in classic literature ?
Well," says I, "I reckon I ought to be ashamed of myself, but the fact is I left them laying around that day I resigned from the choir.
But there's people set up their own ears for a standard, and expect the whole choir to follow
At the hour appointed, Lord de Winter and the four friends repaired to the convent; the bells tolled, the chapel was open, the grating of the choir was closed.
Monsieur Bourais hid part of the choir from view, but directly in front of her, the flock of maidens, wearing white wreaths over their lowered veils, formed a snow-white field, and she recognised her darling by the slenderness of her neck and her devout attitude.
As the service was drawing to a close a boy entered the church in great excitement, ran to the sacristy, dressed himself quickly in the choir robes, and cleaving, thanks to that uniform, the crowd that filled the temple, approached Bazin, who, clad in his blue robe, was standing gravely in his place at the entrance to the choir.
And they say (the starry choir And all the listening things) That Israfeli's fire Is owing to that lyre By which he sits and sings - The trembling living wire Of those unusual strings.
These said that the choir would keep up their lacerating attempts at melody until they would bring down a storm some day that would sink the ship.
And those myriads of statues, which peopled all the spaces between the columns of the nave and the choir, kneeling, standing, equestrian, men, women, children, kings, bishops, gendarmes, in stone, in marble, in gold, in silver, in copper, in wax even,--who has brutally swept them away?
He kept the parish accounts, arranged the treats for the choir and the schools; though there was no organ in the parish church, it was generally considered (in Blackstable) that the choir he led was the best in Kent; and when there was any ceremony, such as a visit from the Bishop for confirmation or from the Rural Dean to preach at the Harvest Thanksgiving, he made the necessary preparations.
Only Friar Tuck leaned over the edge of the choir loft and called out to him ere he had gone, "Good den, Sir Knight.
cried the three hundred voices again, but instead of the band a choir began singing a cantata composed by Paul Ivanovich Kutuzov:
The congregation had been used to seeing Will at church in former days, and no one took much note of him except the choir, who expected him to make a figure in the singing.