choking


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choking

[′chōk·iŋ]
(fluid mechanics)
The condition prevailing in compressible fluid flow when the upper limit of mass flow is reached, or when the speed of sound is reached in a duct.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Michael Smith, who has campaigned with Mrs Stuart, said he had been contacted by many parents who had saved their children from choking on small toys in sweets.
The Child Safety Protection Act of 1994 requires manufacturers to put labels that specifically warn of choking hazards on small balls, latex balloons, games, and vending machines that contain toys.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) agrees that Nestle Magic does not pose a choking hazard and has not opposed distribution of the product because it presents no public health risk for young children.
A case was defined as a death, described in a news report, resulting from self-strangulation or strangulation by another person as part of an activity with elements of the choking game (also known as the "blackout game," "pass-out game," "scarf game," "space monkey," and by other names).
City coroner Aidan Cotter said there was a failure of care which led to Mark Gordon, aged 31, choking on November 22 last year.
In children who survived choking episodes, food items caused the majority (70%) of things removed from children's airways.
s Soft Rattles, which pose a choking hazard; and Fisher-Price's Crib Mobile Toys, which was reported to have leaky batteries.
Patients were excluded if the episode was related to smoke inhalation, choking on secretions or vomitus, submersion injury, strangulation, breath-holding spell, exposure to a toxic or noxious substance, or poisoning.
Menzer and Jacquie Siddens, an emergency room nurse at Sherman Oaks Hospital and a mother of three kids ages 5, 3 and 3 months, both said they see a lot of poisoning and choking incidents.
WASHINGTON - A New York clothing company is recalling about 5,100 children's jackets and vests because a metal ring attached to the zipper can come off, posing a choking hazard.
The California Public Interest Research Group identified the toys in its 16th annual survey on toy safety, ``Trouble in Toyland,'' which said many other toys being sold in stores pose choking hazards for children, the leading cause of toy-related deaths, or contain harmful chemicals.
According to the consumer watchdog agency, 16 children died last year while playing with toys, nine of them from choking.