choler


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Related to choler: cholera

choler

1. Archaic one of the four bodily humours; yellow bile
2. Obsolete biliousness
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References in periodicals archive ?
In Choler, the composer revisits the same austere sound world, exploiting the doubled forces in clever ways.
In his 1633 edition of his "The Herball," John Gerard noted that apothecaries boiled the berries with sugar and honey, and offered the resulting mixture, called rob, as a remedy that "be good for an hot stomacke," and that the berries "quench thirst, they mitigate and allay the heate of hot burning agues, they stop the belly, stay vomiting, [and] cure the bloody slix proceeding of choler.
The blackness of "Melancholie, or blacke choler caused by
For his part, Page, whose cool-headedness contrasts with Ford's choler throughout the play, contributes to the impression that it is Falstaff's financial status that marks him as an outsider.
In the introductory chapter, "Economics, Literature, and the Choler of a Seated Spaniard," Gilbert-Santamaria quickly establishes the focus of his study: cultural consumerism and its effect on both aesthetic values and on the rise of the novel and public theater in Spain.
burnt choler (37): "choller had almost burnt up," Jonson, Sejanus (1603); "choller dart forth fires Like burning Aetna," "R.
Siwt o frethyn trwm, choler a thei,o dan gt oel dyn gyda gwregys trwchus am ei chanol.
In a normal dictionary these can take one form, exemplified by WHO and WHOA, CHOLER and CHOLERA, ETHNOGRAPHIC and ETHNOGRAPHICA.
The humoral term "choler" keeps Claudius's emotions strongly within the flesh, choler being at one and the same time body fluid and raging motion, yellow bile and anger.
change to choler because in humoral theory, as explained in Timothy
Hyd yn oed yn y cyfnod cynnar yma roeddwn yn casu pobl mewn siwtiau, pwysig, gyda choler a thei.
For a discussion of Shakespeare's representations of choler, see Draper, The Humors and Shakespeare's Character, chapter 4.