choragic monuments

choragic monuments

(kərăj`ĭk, –rāj`–, kō–) [Gr.,=of the choragus, the chorus leader], small decorative structures erected in ancient Greece to commemorate the victory of the leader of a chorus in the competitive choral dances. The best known is that of Lysicrates (c.335 B.C.), still standing in Athens, a graceful circular structure showing one of the early uses of Corinthian columns.
References in classic literature ?
The story is figured in a different form on the reliefs from the choragic monument of Lysicrates, now in the British Museum (17).