chorus girl

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Related to chorine: chlorine

chorus girl

a girl who dances or sings in the chorus of a musical comedy, revue, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cardboard cutouts of the Ham Tree chorines evoke the flat, unsexed character of McIntyre's bride.
The application of chorine in ready-to-use F&V is already banned in some European countries, including The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland and Belgium because of their potential toxicity.
The market had been used chorine, but as for environmental impacts, end- users have been trading it for hydrogen peroxide, chlorine dioxide, oxygen, and ozone.
Chlorinated polyethylene grades Weipren[R] 6025 (25% chlorine content, named as CPE25) and CPE 135A (35% chorine content, named as CPE35) were obtained from Lianda Corporation, USA and Weifang Xuran Chemicals, China respectively.
The Toronto Local Section would like to thank 'C4' (the Canadian Chorine Coordinating Committee) for their financial support of this meeting.
Nikki'' stars Nikki Cox as a leggy (and everything else-y) Vegas chorine at a dismal hotel revue and Nick von Esmarch as her bulky husband, an aspiring TV wrestler grappling under the moniker The Crybaby.
Our product is not only easy to use but is the only currently available cleaner that we are aware of that does not use harmful additives such as bleach, chorine, acid or sodium hydroxide making it extremely safe to use .
Its Chemical business, OxyChem, includes manufacturing of Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) resins, chorine, calcium chloride, and caustic soda.
Prior to the development of Boron CLS Bond(R), lubricant additives contained graphite, chorine, molybdenum, sulfonates and zinc/phosphorus compounds that did not chemically bond to metal surfaces, and were either toxic or produced toxic byproducts and/or corrosive acids.
The company noted the filing was necessitated by plant start-up delays and construction cost overruns, weak demand for chorine and an unprofitable caustic soda distribution business.
From 1936 through the 1960s, choreographers from the ballet and modern dance worlds--George Balanchine, Agnes de Mille, Jack Cole, Hanya Holm, Helen Tamiris, Michael Kidd, Jerome Robbins, and Bob Fosse--created a very demanding offshoot of jazz dance that surpassed the technical skills of the chorine or dance act and required instead a trained dancer.