chorography


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Related to chorography: choreography

chorography

[kə′räg·rə·fē]
(mapping)
All of the methods used to map a region or district.
References in periodicals archive ?
Basing her arguments not only on formal curricula and anecdotal evidence of informal practices but also (and especially) on a careful examination of inventories of books owned by Oxford and Cambridge colleges and by individual masters and students and on a no less careful examination of the collective biographies of those book owners and producers, Cormack demonstrates that all three branches of geographical practice - mathematical geography, descriptive geography, and chorography - commanded keen, persistent, and widespread university attention in the crucial forty years from 1580 to 1620 when the English began seriously thinking of theirs as an imperial nation.
21) In fact, Dante's chorography of Italy here goes beyond surviving cartographical and geographical descriptions from the period in its synthetic description of the mountain and hydrographic systems of north-central Italy.
The tiny tots in the audience were definitely taken in by the colourful and eye- catching chorography as they tried to imitate the intricate mudra's of the onstage dancers.
Chapters 3 and 4 concentrate on chorography and the vita of the saintly hermit Nicholas.
I feel our culture, that is to say, ancient Indian culture specially the Aryan culture has been beautifully mixed in their chorography.
In Charting an Empire Lesley Cormack argues that the newly institutionalized study of geography in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries witnessed an emerging emphasis on chorography.
The company is known for its approach of tapping a variety of sources and combining elements of slapstick, high- and low-tech design and a highly developed style of chorography in its productions, so expect anything but a conventional take on this Hemingway classic.
Another artist who uses trauma as her subject is Deborah Luster, whose photographic project A Tooth for an Eye: A Chorography of Violence in Orleans Parish, 2008, documents sites in the city where homicides have occurred.
Summit's richly textured reading of the cartography and chorography of John Leland and his successors adroitly weaves together the concerns of the previous four essays.
This monograph intersects with current investigations of topics of much interest, such as the early modern city and the culture of cartography, chorography, landscapes, and cityscapes -- those of Poitiers in particular from the 1560s through the early 1580s--the literary, social, historical, and political dynamics of Renaissance literary coteries and circles--Madeleine and Catherine des Roches's salon being one of the earliest and best-known in France--the French Wars of Religion and historical writing by both male and female authors such as the Des Roches team; and the connections between collaborative writing circles, editors, publishers, and the book market.
The infectious humour, the exuberance of the cast and some pin-sharp chorography had us all out of our seats at the end.
On the other hand, in NDT1's first dance, Safe As Houses, there was inventive, witty chorography, an abundance of grace, elegance, energy and excellent technical dancing.