chronic alcoholism


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chronic alcoholism

[′krän·ik ′al·kə‚hȯ‚liz·əm]
(medicine)
Excessive consumption of alcohol over a prolonged period of time.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evidence for a defect in tryptophan metabolism in chronic alcoholism.
Similarly, studies in humans found that DNMT3a and DNMT3b mRNA levels were significantly reduced in patients with chronic alcoholism compared with healthy control subjects (Bonsch et al.
In a desperate bid to cut down on chronic alcoholism - the average Russian drinks 32 pints of pure alcohol a year - beer is now considered booze.
Rental payments and royalties from future mining on the land will fund programs and services for Trust beneficiaries, who include people with mental illness, developmental disabilities, chronic alcoholism and other substance-related disorders, and Alzheimer's disease and related dementia.
An inquest into his death at Prestatyn yesterday, heard that the former builder suffered with chronic alcoholism and depression ever since the suicide of his partner in 2004 became the first of a series of tragedies.
These conditions include: series of strokes, side effects from medication, depression, chronic alcoholism, some tumors and infections in the brain, vitamin B12 deficiency, dehydration, and metabolic disorders including hypothyroidism in the elderly.
Statistics released to the Sunday Mercury under the Freedom of Information Act show that 305 children under the age of 16 were treated at Shrewsbury and Telford Hospitals for chronic alcoholism, alcohol poisoning or mental and behavioural disorders linked to booze between January 2008 and December 2010.
Although few patients reported current alcohol abuse, the medical records showed chronic alcoholism or abuse in approximately half.
There are a currently a number of pharmacologic strategies for persons suffering from chronic alcoholism.
An inquest concluded Mr Walsh had died from cardiac arrest, as a result of chronic alcoholism.
5,6) Cervical epidural abscess without predisposing factors have been reported before (7), however, previous case series (4) have shown that the development of spinal abscess is predisposed by risk factors such as intravenous drug abuse, nonspinal infection (cellulitis, furuncles, retropharyngeal or psoas abscess and endocarditis); diabetes mellitus, chronic alcoholism, recent spinal or epidural procedures, recent spinal trauma, HIV infection, and chronic steroid use.
Chronic alcoholism was common (39%), especially among the 6 case-patients who died (67%).

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