chronic leukemia


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Related to chronic leukemia: chronic lymphocytic leukemia

chronic leukemia

[′krän·ik lü′kēm·e·ə]
(medicine)
A leukemia in which the life expectancy is prolonged; leukemias are classified as to acute or chronic, and according to the predominant cell type; the life expectancy is highly variable depending on the latter.
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References in periodicals archive ?
To our knowledge, only one population-based study investigated survival after receipt of an allogeneic HSCT among persons with either acute or chronic leukemia.
The approach to diagnosis of CLMO is similar to that for chronic leukemias of lymphoid origin and is based on the complete blood count (CBC), morphologic examination of the peripheral blood smear, special stains, cytogenetic data, and clinical correlation.
A diagnosis of chronic leukemia may be first suspected in an older adult who is found to have an elevated white cell count but who is otherwise in good health.
Understand how future advancements in chronic leukemia prognostication have the potential to shift treatment paradigms
Chronic leukemia progresses more slowly and allows greater numbers of more mature, functional cells to be made.
The drug has shown in vitro and in vivo activity against both acute and chronic leukemia.
Chronic myelogenous leukemia is a form of chronic leukemia characterized by increased production of myeloid cells in the bone marrow.
Doctors use stem cells, like those found in cord blood, to treat over 75 serious conditions including sickle cell anemia and acute and chronic leukemia.
Manifold succumbed to chronic leukemia earlier this year.
The company will be sending copies of the breaking news of a 32 year-old father in the Netherlands, suffering with chronic leukemia since 1995, who was successfully treated using the stem cells from the umbilical cord blood of his newborn daughter.
Eight patients with chronic leukemia entered a complete molecular remission, which is a state of no detectable cancer cells, and this suggests strongly that donor immune cells might eradicate these diseases.