chryselephantine


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chryselephantine

(krĭs'ĕləfăn`tĭn, –tīn), Greek sculptural technique developed in the 6th cent. B.C. Sculptures, especially temple colossi, were made with an inner core of wood overlaid with ivory, to simulate flesh, and gold, to represent drapery. The great Parthenon Athena, now lost, was chryselephantine.

chryselephantine

Made of gold and ivory; descriptive of statues of divinities, like Zeus at Olympia, with ivory for the flesh and gold for the drapery, on a wooden armature.
References in periodicals archive ?
This emphasis on chryselephantine sculpture partly needs to be read against the background of the prevailing ethnocentrism.
We are also treated to explanations of how ivory is shaped, bent, and molded to create a chryselephantine statue, with illustrations, and why the pool in front of the statue was necessary; it's the glue in the joined strips that needs the moisture.
LAPATIN's Chryselephantine statuary in the ancient Mediterranean world (xvi+242 pages, 2 figures, 249 b&w photographs, 14 colour plates.
Top material is chryselephantine (gilded bronze and ivory).
Preiss was quite particular, often using the chryselephantine - a combination of ivory and bronze - for his models of young girls, usually in the form of a dancer but sometimes a simple standing nude with her arms flung joyously wide above her head.
It has also been proposed that it represents the legendary master craftsman Daidalos, who built the labyrinth at Knossos, or even the famous 5th-century BC Athenian sculptor Pheidias, creator of the chryselephantine cult statue of Zeus at Olympia and master craftsman of the sculptures of the Parthenon on the Athenian Acropolis.
The Palaikastro kouros: a Minoan chryselephantine statuette and its Aegean Bronze Age context (British School at Athens Studies 6).
If Shefton is correct that it quotes elements from the east pediment and the west frieze of the Parthenon as well as the chryselephantine statues of Zeus at Olympia, and the Athena Parthenos at Athens (Shefton 1982), it would seem that a pot-painter was making (or a metalworker had made) the connection between a work signed by Pheidias (the Zeus) with sculptures which have been linked to teams of sculptors working under his supervision (the Parthenon).