churchgoer

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churchgoer

1. a person who attends church regularly
2. an adherent of an established Church in contrast to a Nonconformist
References in periodicals archive ?
One suggestion in the Event Planning Guide involves churchgoers, youth groups, Bible study classes, or even entire churches purchasing professionally designed t-shirts that will be worn on Care for Pastors Sunday.
Survey My Church allows churchgoers to quickly and anonymously use the smartphone app to rate the service they have just attended.
Some 37 per cent of the 569 churchgoers polled said their opinion of the Labour leader had worsened.
The poll of 569 churchgoers, for the Coalition for Marriage, found that 86% of churchgoers believe that even if the Government changes the law to exempt religious buildings, this will be overturned by the European Court of Human Rights.
Although reports of negative emotions decline on Saturdays for all Americans in general, frequent churchgoers still report experiencing still fewer negative emotions on Sundays, while negativity increased on that day for those who attend church seldom or never.
And fellow churchgoer Annette Minogue said: "It's very sad.
uk The response to the survey was so impressive, it means there is something here for everyone, whether they are an occasional churchgoer, a committed Christian or a struggling believer with many questions.
Thousands of Copts clashed with Egyptian police during a funeral procession Thursday for the seven people killed in a shootingAaattack on churchgoers leaving a midnight Mass for Coptic Christians, security officials said.
One churchgoer said: "Parishioners are deeply disappointed with his behaviour.
The study, called Faith in Rural Communities: Contributions of Social Capital to Community Vibrancy, found villages are more vibrant because of events and activities organised by churchgoers.
He adds that he knows of no study examining whether groups such as priests and frequent churchgoers have elevated rates of cancer or other pollution-associated health problems.
In that case, Hollywood recognized that a large number of churchgoers could be encouraged to see the film and think about the implications if they talked about it during services, said Eddie Gibbs, professor of church growth.

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