Ciborium

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Related to ciboria: cruets

Ciborium

 

originally a drinking vessel; in Christian churches a tabernacle placed under the altar canopy. Later the altar canopy itself began to be called the ciborium; it was usually supported by columns and richly ornamented. The vessel or box in which the Communion wafers are placed is also called a ciborium.


Ciborium

 

in Orthodoxy, a type of church receptacle used to hold the consecrated bread of the Eucharist. Ciboria were usually made of silver and modeled in the form of a Christian church in miniature.

baldachin, baldacchino, baldachino, baldaquin, ciborium

An ornamental canopy over an altar, usually supported on columns, or a similar form over a tomb or throne.
References in periodicals archive ?
For additional references beyond those appearing in the notes that follow regarding both arcuated and trabeated altar ciboria, see Deer, Dynastic Porphyry Tombs, 32 n.
In a general way Arnolfo's ciboria resemble the two-storied construction of 1243-48 that dominates the apse of the upper chapel of the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris, restored with reasonable accuracy in the nineteenth century after its destruction during the French Revolutionary period.
Early-medieval ciboria that have been altered include those in Sant'Ambrogio, Milan (ninth and eleventh centuries), and in San Marco, Venice (sixth[?
Altar ciboria in early Italian art lend themselves to such multiple interpretations as well.
On this aspect of Arnolfo's two ciboria, see Moskowitz, Italian Gothic Sculpture, 52, 56.
The design of the plate returned to the pre-Reformation jewelled and enamelled chalices, ciboria, crosiers and altar crosses.
Owen Ramsden was a prolific supplier of church plate: chalices, patens and ciboria, alms dishes and crosiers, drawing on both Gothic and Romanesque styles.
Caskey shows how the Rufolo family appropriated what had theretofore been discrete religious space by commissioning striking chapels, pulpits, ciboria, and statuary.
Four other chalices, three ciboria, two silver candlesticks and three pattens were also taken in the weekend raid.
As part of her search for a context in which to view the Eton Roundels and their original designer's achievement, she investigates pictorial and textual parallels in compendia such as the Biblia Pauperum and Speculum Humanae Salvationis, and in other English works of art, including some twelfth-century |Worcester Verses', three twelfth-century English ciboria and some fourteenth-century Worcester misericords.
Neither the seminary nor the archdiocese would sell sacred objects such as chalices, patens, ciboria, tabernacles, [or] altars to museums or private collectors.
When I was on a bus with priests and seminarians returning ciboria of Hosts after the Mass celebrated by Pope John Paul II in Toronto in 1984, I was seated next to a senior seminarian.