cicada

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cicada

(sĭkā`də), large, noise-producing insectinsect,
invertebrate animal of the class Insecta of the phylum Arthropoda. Like other arthropods, an insect has a hard outer covering, or exoskeleton, a segmented body, and jointed legs. Adult insects typically have wings and are the only flying invertebrates.
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 of the order Homoptera, with a stout body, a wide, blunt head, protruding eyes, and two pairs of membranous wings. The front wings, which are longer than the rear pair, extend beyond the insect's abdomen. Male cicadas have platelike membranes on the thorax, which they vibrate like drum heads, producing a loud, shrill sound. Females of most species are mute. Characteristic songs are produced by members of different species; each also produces a noise indicating irritation, and some have special courtship songs.

There are about 2,000 cicada species distributed throughout the tropical and temperate regions of the world; they are most numerous in Asia and Australia. There are about 180 species in North America; adults of these species range from approximately 1 to 2 in. (2.5–5 cm) in length. The periodical cicadas (Magicicada species), found in the eastern half of the continent, have the longest known life cycles of any insect. Because of their periodic appearance they are often called locusts, although they are not related to true locustslocust,
in zoology, name for certain migratory members of the short-horned grasshopper family (Acrididae). Like other members of this family, locusts have antennae shorter than their bodies, song-producing organs on the forewings and hind legs, and hind legs well developed for
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.

Their life cycle takes 17 years in northern species (the so-called 17-year locusts) and 13 years in southern species; the two types overlap in parts of the United States. The female deposits her eggs in slits that she cuts in young twigs. In about six weeks the wingless, scaly larvae, or nymphs, drop from the tree and burrow into the ground, where they remain for 13 or 17 years, feeding on juices sucked from roots. The nymphs molt periodically as they grow; finally the full-grown nymphs emerge at night, climb tree trunks and fences, and shed their last larval skin. The winged adults, which generally emerge together in large numbers, live for about one week. Different broods mature at regular intervals, so that at least one colony is conspicuous in some part of the United States each year, and even in a given locality a brood may appear every few years.

Other North American cicadas (Tibicen species and others) are known as dog-day cicadas, or harvest flies, because the adults appear in late summer. Their life cycle is thought to be similar to that of the periodical cicadas, but in most species it is completed in two years.

Cicada larvae do little damage, but when adults appear in large numbers their egg-laying may damage young trees. Cicadas are sometimes kept for their song in Asia, as they were in ancient Greece. They are classified in the phylum ArthropodaArthropoda
[Gr.,=jointed feet], largest and most diverse animal phylum. The arthropods include crustaceans, insects, centipedes, millipedes, spiders, scorpions, and the extinct trilobites.
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, class Insecta, order Homoptera, family Cicadidae.

cicada

symbol of eternal life. [Chinese Folklore: Jobes, 338]

cicada

symbol of talkativeness because of its constant, strident noise. [Folklore: Jobes, 338]

cicada

, cicala
any large broad insect of the homopterous family Cicadidae, most common in warm regions. Cicadas have membranous wings and the males produce a high-pitched drone by vibration of a pair of drumlike abdominal organs
References in periodicals archive ?
Si tratta, innanzitutto, di un'ape invece che di una cicala.
On February 5, the kidnappers gave the Italian government until 2 March to respond to its demands or Cicala would be killed.
The group made no reference to Cicala s wife, who was kidnapped with him in December in Mauritania.
Steve Cicala presto una excelente asistencia en la investigacion.
4) It is not surprising that several years after Gumilla's death, exiled Jesuits would still praise El Orinoco ilustrado--as Mario Cicala did in his own historical-topographical relation published in Italy (1771).
Stephen Stern and John Allan Cicala (Logan: Utah State University Press, 1991), 137-56, discusses historical continuities and changes in contemporary powwows.
Buyer benefits will pull this technology through in 2007-08," predicts Robert Cicala, Dura's director of engineering for Body & Glass Products.
Mario Cicala, who massaged Nedved's aches after training at former club Lazio, said: "I've never seen anyone like him.
The dynamic and burgeoning interdisciplinary literature on the construction of such "categorical statuses" (Calhoun 1993) indicates extraordinary fluidity in concepts of ethnicity, race, and nation, as well as minority status (Berbrier forthcoming; Hobsbawm 1990; Davis 1991; Nagel 1994; Loveman 1999; Rockquemore and Brunsma, 2002; Roosens 1989; Stern and Cicala 1991).
The Florentine government, which had denied him entry to the city, was nevertheless involved in negotiations, and in January 1433 sought to honor his ambassadors, identified by Giovanni di Jacopo Morelli as a German, a Hungarian, and the Genoese diplomat and imperial councillor, Battista Cicala.