cinder block

(redirected from cinderblock)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

cinder block

[′sin·dər ‚bläk]
(materials)
A hollow block made of cinder concrete.
(metallurgy)
A block which closes the front of a blast furnace, containing the cinder notch.

cinder block, Brit.

clinker block A lightweight masonry unit made of cinder concrete; widely used for interior partitions.
References in periodicals archive ?
I'd drive by the school, look over at the crumbled cinderblock around the plaque, and think, 'I'll get to that some day.
He said that from the cinderblock wall he could see Pfaff continue to beat Coleman through the partially open front door.
The finished posters were laminated and are to grace the bare cinderblock walls of our lunch room.
The solution's automated configuration makes it very easy to set up and manage, security is far better than what we previously had, and the range of the U4EA access points is much improved - a single AP can cover up to 6 classrooms with cinderblock walls.
Ensconced deep in the Andean banana groves of western Colombia, the cinderblock bunker had churned out an estimated US$3 million in phony US bills every week for the previous 10 years.
Almost all production goes on behind cinderblock walls topped with barbed wire, behind metal gates, and with heavily armed guards.
All that matters now is the bottom line, and radio like we heard in the early days of KSHE, broadcasting from a cinderblock shack and taking listener requests, will be a thing of the past in major markets.
Inside, the white cinderblock halls are almost like a public school except that the decorations are squadron insignia, award plaques and photos of P-3s in action.
over large campuses or in buildings where cinderblock walls or asbestos make traditional wiring impossible), wireless networks provide a cost-effective alternative.
I managed to avoid a head-on collision with the cinderblock wall, but the four-wheeler's front fender and front rack caught the corner of the building and slammed me face-first into it.
At one job I shared a cinderblock, eight-by-eight-foot office with my assistant, a woman with whom I remain good friends (sometimes familiarity does not breed contempt).
One had cinderblock partitions that made a series of small, cell-like rooms.