cinematography

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cinematography:

see motion picture photographymotion picture photography
or cinematography,
photographic arts and techniques involved in making motion pictures.

See also photography, still. The Camera
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Cinematography

 

a branch of culture and industry comprising the production of motion pictures and their screening for viewers. As one of the forms of art best suited to a mass audience, cinematography is a major means of political and scientific propaganda. It employs the techniques of motion-picture technology. Motion pictures are produced at film studios, and film and equipment are manufactured by the film industry. Motion pictures are shown in theaters, in halls with portable equipment, and on television.

cinematography

[‚sin·ə·mə′täg·rə·fē]
(graphic arts)
Motion picture photography.

cinematography

the art or science of film (motion-picture) photography
www.cinematographersday.com
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References in periodicals archive ?
This embedding of a cinematographically similar group activity of killing earlier in the film symbolically gathers the group together at Schumacher's side as he pulls the trigger on Jurieu and implicates the spectator as well, suggesting involvement through the visual participation in an earlier slaughter.
He makes various Proustian themes more explicit cinematographically.
He loved to photograph (as Kevin Conru says in his introduction) almost cinematographically, the feasts' tribal dances or festivals given in honour of a great chief.
In these rhythms, there is a more than superficial analogy between Djebar's approach and that of author-cinematographer Marguerite Duras, to whom Djebar's film is deeply indebted both cinematographically and thematically.
It is only in Somewhere that Coppola's presentation of the passing of time cinematographically matches up with how her characters experience it in the script: as relentless, mundane, and sometimes overbearing, but also, most commonly, as completely lacking in variation.
Cinematographically, the use of long and medium shots, few point-of-view shots, little camera movement, and a visual style characterized by neutral colors ensures a detached narrative tone.