cinnamon

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Related to cinnamic: cinnamic acid, Cinnamic alcohol, Cinnamic aldehyde

cinnamon,

name for trees and shrubs of the genus Cinnamomum of the family Lauraceae (laurellaurel,
common name for the Lauraceae, a family of forest trees and shrubs found mainly in tropical SE Asia but also abundant in tropical America. Most have aromatic bark and foliage and are evergreen; deciduous species are usually those that extend into temperate zones.
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 family). True cinnamon spice comes from the Ceylon or Sri Lanka cinnamon (C. verum or C. zeylanicum), now cultivated in several tropical regions. It is obtained by drying the central part of the bark and is marketed as stick cinnamon or in powdered form. The waste and other parts are used for oil of cinnamon, a medicine and flavoring. Cassia or Chinese cinnamon (C. cassia) was used in China long before true cinnamon. Though considered an inferior substitute for true cinnamon, the spice and oil derived from its bark and that of the related Saigon cinnamon (C. loureiroi) are more commonly sold as cinnamon than spice derived from C. verum bark, which is more delicately flavored. Cinnamon and cassia (often confused) have been favorite spices since biblical times, used also as perfume and incense. Cinnamon is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Magnoliales, family Lauraceae.
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cinnamon

cinnamon

Grows to 50ft (15m) The inner barkConsidered by many cultures to have aphrodisiac properties. Take with anything sugary or sweet because it helps stabilize the sugar levels in the blood. It is a strong fungicide and bacteria-killer that knocks out yeasts and molds (which just happen to feed on sugar). It helps kill dangerous aflatoxins found in all breads and peanuts. These aflatoxins have been connected with liver cancer. That’s right! Eating breads and flour foods on a daily basis can lead to liver cancer. Cinnamon oils are used against HIV and herpes. Aside from killing molds, fungus and bacteria, cinnamon also stimulates circulation and stimulates other herbs to work faster. Used to relieve cramps, colic, stress, anxiety, gas, diarrhea, nosebleeds, heavy menstrual bleeding, blood cleanser, infection preventer, digestive aid, nausea, tiredness, depression, and general body pains. Inhaling oil of cinnamon can help with chest infections, colds. (then follow up with thyme). For uterine and menstrual problems, try cinnamon with blue cohosh.

Cinnamon

 

the dried bark of the branches of the cinnamon trees. It contains essential oil (1–2 percent), tannic substances, and pitch. Cinnamon is used as a spice. It is also used in medicine as an antispasmotic and tonic and in the perfume industry (cinnamon oil).

cinnamon

[′sin·ə·mən]
(botany)
Cinnamomum zeylanicum. An evergreen shrub of the laurel family (Lauraceae) in the order Magnoliales; a spice is made from the bark.

cinnamon

1. a tropical Asian lauraceous tree, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, having aromatic yellowish-brown bark
2. Saigon cinnamon an E Asian lauraceous tree, Cinnamomum loureirii, the bark of which is used as a cordial and to relieve flatulence
3. any of several similar or related trees or their bark
4. a light yellowish brown
References in periodicals archive ?
05 mM), solution P concentrations were increased with the addition of the cinnamic acids (HC and CAF).
The main active ingredients are believed to be benzoic acid and cinnamic acid esters in the oil.
Zosteric acid (p-(sulfo-oxy) cinnamic acid, ~95% zosteric acid and its sodium salt, ~5% impurities consisting of residual sodium chloride, diester of zosteric acid/coumaric acid and diester of zosteric acid) was synthesized in our own laboratory from p-coumaric acid (98% pure) and chlorosulphonic acid (99% pure).
Reaction of dilute nitric acid with 1 in an unmodified domestic microwave oven (which provides multimodal microwave irradiation) leads to the mononitro cinnamic arid derivative (2) and the dinitrostyrene derivative (3).
By using more precise detectors, which defense researchers originally developed for night vision devices, and different matrix molecules based on the perfume compound cinnamic acid, Beavis says he and Chait have refined the Munster team's mass-spectrometer technique into a routine protein-analysis tool.
Contract awarded for Cinnamic Used Construction of multi-purpose gym design services
Although the anti-diabetic activity of cinnamic acid, a pure compound from cinnamon, has been reported but its mechanism(s) is not yet clear.
The investigators used carvacrol, the main volatile compound of oregano, and methyl cinnamate, the methyl ester of cinnamic acid, formulated in film-forming solutions at 0.
One of the main plant secondary metabolites is a salicylic acid, 13-hydroxybenzoic acid that is synthesized from phenylalanine via cinnamic acid and o-coumaric acid or via benzoic acid.
Chemical and biological characterization of cinnamic acid derivatives from cell cultures of lavender (Lavandula officinalis) induced by stress and jasmonic acid.
The antioxidants in hops alone include phenols, cinnamic acid derivatives, coumarins, catechins, proanthocyanidins, and flavonoids, according to Clarissa Gerhauser of Heidelberg, who has counted and classified 78 in toto.
Herein, we introduce the cinnamate group by grafting cinnamic acid onto PVA to prepare the amphiphilic graft polymer poly(vinyl cinnamates) (PVCi) and study its self-assembly behavior in selective solvent (Fig.