cipher

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cipher:

see cryptographycryptography
[Gr.,=hidden writing], science of secret writing. There are many devices by which a message can be concealed from the casual reader, e.g., invisible writing, but the term cryptography strictly applies to translating messages into cipher or code.
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cipher

[′sī·fər]
(communications)
A transposition or substitution code for transmitting secret messages.

cipher

, cypher
1. an obsolete name for zero
2. any of the Arabic numerals (0, 1, 2, 3, etc., to 9) or the Arabic system of numbering as a whole
3. Music a defect in an organ resulting in the continuous sounding of a pipe, the key of which has not been depressed

cipher

(1) The core algorithm used to encrypt data. A cipher transforms regular data (plaintext) into a coded set of data (ciphertext) that is not reversible without a key. For example, AES and DES are examples of secret key block ciphers. The complete encryption algorithm is the cipher plus the technique used to apply the cipher to the message, which can be a very intricate series of steps. See cryptography, encryption algorithm, block cipher, cipher suite and plaintext.

(2) An encrypted character. See ciphertext and cryptography.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first of Carroll's polyalphabetic ciphers, which he named "The Alphabet Cipher," is a kind of Vigenere cipher, and uses the following table:
The second of Carroll's polyalphabetic ciphers, called "The Telegraph Cipher," is a "kind of Beaufort Cipher.
In the first of Carroll's matrix ciphers, the distance is measured between the key phrase letter and the plaintext letter, and that distance becomes the new ciphertext letter.
To support a secure advanced information society, and with the goal of disseminating Camellia, which was selected as a major international standard and recommended cipher, NTT released Camellia source codes as open source on April 13, 2006 so that Camellia can be freely used as an international basic technology.
The adoption of Camellia into the OpenSSL toolkit means that Camellia provides security and performance equivalent to the US government standard cipher AES(3) and is the world's only alternative to AES.
Camellia, the next generation encryption algorithm that provides the world's highest security and performance, is an international standard and recommended cipher.
Among the algorithms proposed by Japan, Camellia (a 128-bit block Cipher developed by NTT and Mitsubishi), MISTY1 (a 64-bit block Cipher developed by Mitsubishi) and PSEC-KEM (a public-key encryption algorithms developed by NTT) were adopted.
In 2001, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) established a US Government Standard 128-bit block Cipher called the Advanced Encryption Standard.
The distinguishing characteristic is the smallest 128-bit block cipher hardware in the world.
differential cryptanalysis and linear cryptanalysis, is recognized to be important in designing a new block cipher.
In related news, the CAST-128 cipher has recently been endorsed by the Government of Canada as one of its official DES replacement algorithms.