circumstellar disk


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circumstellar disk

[‚sər·kəm¦stel·ər ′disk]
(astronomy)
A flattened cloud of gas or small particles that undergoes approximately circular motion about a star, and in which the material velocity is determined primarily by the balance of gravity and centrifugal force.
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Both the star and its circumstellar disk possess magnetic fields.
Our calculation is an estimate of the minimum amount of heavy elements that must be present in circumstellar disks before planets can form," Johnson said.
These polarized images reveal regions of high-density dust typical of a circumstellar disk.
When European astronomers discovered this tiny stellar group about a year ago, they reported two low-mass stars that move in sync with Beta Pictoris, the first star for which astronomers had imaged a circumstellar disk.
Detailed computer simulations have shown us that the gravitational pull of a planet inside a circumstellar disk can perturb gas and dust, creating spiral arms," said Carol Grady, an astronomer with Eureka Scientific, Inc.
In contrast, the standard model of a circumstellar disk, which assumes that a star develops in isolation rather than in a crowded cluster, predicts no such truncation.
a Pic is well known for harbouring an extended and structured circumstellar disk.
By the time this planet has traveled inward-a process that takes a few hundred thousand years-the circumstellar disk has considerably less mass and lower density than when it started.
The planet may have formed at its location in a primordial circumstellar disk by gravitationally sweeping up remaining gas, or it may have migrated outward through a game of gravitational billiards, where it exchanged momentum with smaller planetary bodies.
Washington, November 20 (ANI): A team of astronomers has captured the first direct, well-resolved infrared images of a circumstellar disk around a young massive star called HD 200775, to illuminate a massive star formation process.
Adams and Watkins began their study by showing that vortices can occur naturally within a rotating, circumstellar disk.
Though nearly all of the approximately two-dozen known light-scattering circumstellar disks have been viewed by Hubble to date, Beta Pictoris is the first and best example of what a young planetary system looks like, say researchers.