cisalpine


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cisalpine

1. on this (the southern) side of the Alps, as viewed from Rome
2. relating to a movement in the Roman Catholic Church to minimize the authority of the pope and to emphasize the independence of branches of the Church
References in periodicals archive ?
Richard Simpson and Lord Acton were almost quaint echoes of the Cisalpine movement amidst the louder voices of Gasquet, Hilaire Belloc, and Hughes.
It was not the case that some individual adjective of the locative type cisalpine underwent a semantic change from the realm of space to that of time--no such case is documented nor is it easy to imagine how such a change could come about with subsequent irradiation of the new temporal meaning to the prefix cis-; the temporal meaning must have arisen at the very moment of the creation of the adjectives cis-reformation and cis-Elisabethan.
The Po Valley was colonized by Romans and Italians, organized as the province of Cisalpine Gaul about 81 B.
This unusual situation started in the eighth century with the gift of the small parcel of land by the Lord of Campione to St Ambrosius of Milan Managing to bypass war and disputes down the succeeding centuries Campione was incorrected firms in the Cisalpine Republic and thence into the kingdom of Italy on its creation in 1861 and has remained to while happily letting the Swiss look after currency customs post and telephone services.
The Reverend Joseph Berington, an English Catholic writer and an ardent Cisalpine, wrote in 1785 a reply to his old friend, John Augustine Hawkins, who had left the Benedictines and resigned from the priesthood in order to marry.
To reach Italy from Cisalpine Gaul, Caesar and his army had to cross which geographic feature?
Francs and centimes from France, Sardinia, Parma, the old Cisalpine Republic and the new kingdom of Italy were still in use.