civilizing process

civilizing process

the historical process in which, according to ELIAS (1939), people acquired a greater capacity for controlling their emotions. Elias indicates how in Western societies the pattern of living – ‘structures of affects’ – that came to be regarded as ‘civilized’, involved profound redefinitions of previously ‘normal’ and ‘proper’behaviour. In a detailed 'S ociogenetic’ study of manners, social stratification and state formation, Elias shows how new standards of decorum and repugnance came into existence. See also FIGURATION, COURT SOCIETY.
References in classic literature ?
The work of ameliorating the conditions of life--the true civilizing process that makes life more and more secure--had gone steadily on to a climax.
The dominance of white, male members in the club and the emphasis on climbing, or conquering, the next peak is reminiscent of the way in which Gail Bederman connects masculinity and race identity to the civilizing process in Manliness and Civilization (Chicago, 1995).
Hereby I draw theoretically on Norbert Elias' work The civilizing process from 1939, in which he explores the civilizing achievements in Europe from the renaissance to the early modern times hereby stressing the interplay between psychogenetic and sociogenetic constituents.
The authors published a paper (titled "The Civilizing Process in London's Old Bailey") in PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences).
Discourses of civility celebrate collective goals and self-discipline, but the civilizing process itself, as social scientists have recognized since at least the pioneering work of Norbert Elias ([1939] 1994), is riven with power and hierarchy, and commonly leads to unequal distribution of resources.
In 1939, sociologist Norbert Elias published a renowned work "The Civilizing Process," in which he traced changes in interpersonal behavior and manners in the Western world over eight centuries.
To examine the civilizing process, den Otter presents a number of case study essays, which form the chapters of the book.
The civilizing process is not always neatly cyclical.
The second trend, the Civilizing Process, is an idea he developed from the work of Norbert Elias.
The second is the process sociology of Norbert Elias, especially his work on "the civilizing process," but seen through the eyes of someone with a long-term engagement in critical social theory.
In the pages that follow, I focus on moments that interrupt the civilizing process, arguing that these seemingly destructive shows of the interior are, in fact, equally, if not more, invested in the production of the self as the layers of dissimulation involved in the proper behavior demanded at court.
Yet underclass figures are also productive for the wider civilizing process.