clause


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Related to clause: subordinate clause

clause

Clauses are groups of words that contain both a subject and a predicate.
There are two main types of clauses: independent clauses, which can function independently as sentences, and dependent clauses, which depend on an independent clause to form a sentence.
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clause

Law a section of a legal document such as a contract, will, or draft statute

Clause

 

a technical legal term used to denote:

(1) Each individual provision or condition in such documents as constitutions, statutes, declarations, laws, treaties, resolutions, and instructions.

(2) In the narrow sense, a special provision or reservation attached to a treaty.

clause

[klȯz]
(computer science)
A part of a statement in the COBOL language which may describe the structure of an elementary item, give initial values to items in independent and group work areas, or redefine data previously defined by another clause.

clause

In the AIA documents, a subdivision of a subparagraph, identified by four numerals, e.g., 3.3.10.1.

clause

(logic)
A logical formula in conjunctive normal form, which has the schema

p1 ^ ...^ pm => q1 V ... V qn.

or, equivalently,

~p1 V ... V ~pn V q1 V ... V qn,

where pi and qi are atoms.

The operators ~, ^, V, => are connectives, where ~ stands for negation, ^ for conjunction, V for disjunction and => for implication.

clause

(grammar)
A part of a sentence (or programming language statement) that does not constitute a full sentence, e.g. an adjectival clause in human language or a WHERE clause in a SQL statement.
References in classic literature ?
Poligny pointed with a hesitating finger to this last clause, which we certainly did not expect.
To the proposition, then, that slaves whose cases come within the terms of this clause "shall be delivered up", their oaths are unanimous.
Attempts have been made to pervert this clause into an objection against the Constitution, by representing it on one side as a criminal toleration of an illicit practice, and on another as calculated to prevent voluntary and beneficial emigrations from Europe to America.
For once more he saw before his mind's eye, as clear as transparency, the strange clauses of the will.
Yes; but listen to this clause, my dear Planchet, and if you do not find it equitable in every respect when it is written, well, we can scratch it out again: --
I have said that Newman was observant, but it must be admitted that on this occasion he failed to notice a certain delicate glance which passed between Madame de Bellegarde and the marquis, and which we may presume to have been a commentary upon the innocence displayed in that latter clause of his speech.
In its original form, this law offered a premium for cat-heads (fourpence a-piece), but the Senate succeeded in amending the main clause, so as to substitute the word "tails" for "heads.
My interlocutress appeared incapable of grasping more than one clause in any proposition, and she declared quickly, eagerly, as if she were answering my whole speech: "I am not in the least fond of Venice.
If they are coming, Sir Harry will let them move in before the twenty-ninth, and he will cross out the clause about whitewashing the ceilings, because it made them nervous, and put in the fair wear and tear one.
The precise words of the clause that refers to this matter are enclosed.
At the last clause of this announcement a senseless anger swelled the young man's breast.
Everything honourable and soothing, every present enjoyment, and every future hope was contained in it; and her acceptance, with only the saving clause of Papa and Mamma's approbation, was eagerly given.