clear-cutting


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clear-cutting

[′klir ‚kəd·iŋ]
(forestry)
Felling and removing all trees in a forest area.
References in periodicals archive ?
This issue is somewhat unique in its relation to the clear-cutting of large forest areas.
Clear-cutting also promotes invasive species, as well as pests such as deer ticks, Ms.
No doubt, clear-cutting and other timber-harvest activity suffer from an image problem, one that is hard to disguise.
In Soviet-era Lithuania, clear-cutting was almost completely banned in national parks as the USSR gathered its lumber from Belarus and Russia.
Logging, dams, power projects, roads, miners, farmers, a government push to be the world's greatest soybean producer--all this and clear-cutting land for crops and cattle--are the culprits.
Jim Miller, Clergue's general manager, explained some of the philosophies in forestry and the silvicultural systems, such as clear-cutting and selection harvesting, which is based on the age and species of tree, the ecology of the site and its effect on wildlife.
Most clear-cutting in the tropics is to convert land to agriculture," says Richard Donovan, chief of forestry for the Rainforest Alliance.
NWF and the affiliates derailed one wrong-headed plan that called for clear-cutting 24,000 acres of national forest to allow 10,000 additional acre feet of water to reach the Platte.
Modern agriculture, for instance, involves widespread draining of wetlands and other alterations of natural processes, intensive forestry includes clear-cutting entire forests, and urban development includes pollution from industry as well as habitat alteration from suburban sprawl.
If it had been clear-cutting of timber or logging of timber on a large area of the property, such notice would have been given.
Clear-cutting in the Hoosier National Forest has generally produced openings greater than 4 ha.
When CEO Tom Stephens announced that BC's largest forest company was going to stop clear-cutting old growth forests within five years, Greenpeace forests campaigner Karen Mahon was right by his side, toasting him with a bottle of Dom Perignon.