clear

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clear

1. emptied of freight or cargo
2. (of timber) having a smooth, unblemished surface
3. Showjumping (of a round) ridden without any fences being knocked down or any points being lost

clear

[klir]
(computer science)
To restore a storage device, memory device, or binary stage to a prescribed state, usually that denoting zero. Also known as reset.
A function key on calculators, to delete an entire problem or just the last keyboard entry.
(meteorology)
After United States weather observing practice, the state of the sky when it is cloudless or when the sky cover is less than 0.1 (to the nearest tenth).
To change from a stormy or cloudy weather condition to one of no precipitation and decreased cloudiness.
(navigation)
In marine navigation, to leave or pass safely, as to clear port or clear a shoal.
(ordnance)
To give a person a security clearance.
To operate a gun so as to unload it or make certain no ammunition remains; to free a gun of stoppages.

clear

The net distance, free from interruption, between any two surfaces or areas.

clear

i. In air traffic control, it means permitted to take off or land, cleared to carry out other maneuvers, or cleared to proceed under specified conditions. The activity the pilot is cleared to perform is either suffixed to the word clear, as in “clear to take off,” or it is in response to the request by the pilot as when “Permission to take off?” is answered by an air traffic controller's “Clear.”
ii. To rectify stoppage in an automatic weapon. Also to ensure its serviceability as in “clearing guns” (by firing a small burst into the air).
iii. Authorized to carry out any task as in “Clear to alter height” or “Clear to fly radial.”
iv. The area around the aircraft is clear for aircraft starting.
v. In reference to the sky, it is devoid of any clouds as in “clear sky.” The aircraft may also be in between layers but in VMC (visual meteorological conditions). Also means, “A portion of the sky is free or relatively free of clouds.”
vi. To check nearby airspace for safe airwork or maneuvering of aircraft.
vii. To clear an engine. To open the throttle of an idling reciprocating engine in flight to free it from carbon and/or an overrich mixture.
viii. To clear the air, meaning to gain a favorable air situation in a given sector.
ix. To authorize hardware as fit for use.
x. To fly over an obstacle without touching it (i.e., clear of obstacles).

CLEAR

(language)
A specification language based on initial algebras.

["An Informal Introduction to Specification Using CLEAR", R.M. Burstall in The Correctness Problem in Computer Science, R.S. Boyer et al eds, Academic Press 1981, pp. 185-213].
References in classic literature ?
In the next place, from reflecting on the circumstance that I doubted, and that consequently my being was not wholly perfect (for I clearly saw that it was a greater perfection to know than to doubt), I was led to inquire whence I had learned to think of something more perfect than myself; and I clearly recognized that I must hold this notion from some nature which in reality was more perfect.
CRITO: Yes, Socrates; that will clearly be the answer.
The necessity of a concurrent jurisdiction in certain cases results from the division of the sovereign power; and the rule that all authorities, of which the States are not explicitly divested in favor of the Union, remain with them in full vigor, is not a theoretical consequence of that division, but is clearly admitted by the whole tenor of the instrument which contains the articles of the proposed Constitution.
From the cursory view here taken, it must clearly appear to have been an arduous part.
I began to tell our adventures, articulating each syllable clearly, and without omitting one single detail.
When he prepares for any undertaking this gentleman immediately explains to you, elegantly and clearly, exactly how he must act in accordance with the laws of reason and truth.
Also, she has informed me that, since you have given certain directions in writing, she has followed them (though again I do not clearly remember all that she said--I only remember that she said a very great deal, for she is a most tiresome old woman).
There is, however, among these notes the following interesting paragraph, written in 1840 and clearly foreshadowing The Great Stone Face:
The idea which the raconteur has either failed to entertain clearly, or has sacrificed in its expression to his national love of point, is, doubtless, the very tenable one that the higher order of music is the most thoroughly estimated when we are exclusively alone.
It is also necessary to show clearly, not only which of these governments is best for a state, but also how it ought to be established there, and other things we will treat of briefly.
He did not contradict his clever and eloquent counsel, who argued that the brain fever, or inflammation of the brain, was the cause of the crime; clearly proving that this malady had existed long before the murder was perpetrated, and had been brought on by the sufferings of the accused.
The reader should grasp clearly the date at which this book was written.