clears


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Related to clears: clears the air, clears throat

clear lumber, clean timber, clears, clear stuff, clear timber, free stuff

Wood free of knots and other defects.
References in classic literature ?
Did I perhaps learn from it the long clear silence?
A good roguish thing is also the long silence, and to look, like the winter-sky, out of a clear, round-eyed countenance:--
He swung clear, looked round, shrugged his shoulders, and began to walk away, as one having business elsewhere.
He tore his way through his persecutors, flinging one of them clear over the parapet; he bowled a horse and his rider down, and plunged straight for the next, got home with his horns, wounding both horse and man; on again, here and there and this way and that; and one after another he tore the bowels out of two horses so that they gushed to the ground, and ripped a third one so badly that although they rushed him to cover and shoved his bowels back and stuffed the rents with tow and rode him against the bull again, he couldn't make the trip; he tried to gallop, under the spur, but soon reeled and tottered and fell, all in a heap.
There he sees the cable ranged, the windlass disconnected, the compressors opened; and there, after giving his own last order, "Stand clear of the cable
I'll buy Pari-Sulay, but I'll put only ten boys on it and clear slowly.
One black cloud, no bigger than a little boat, drifted out into the clear space unattended, and kept moving westward.
Anger is the egg of Fear-- Only lidless eyes are clear.
The first of these two clauses, it is clear, only provides a mode for appointing such officers, "whose appointments are NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR in the Constitution, and which SHALL BE ESTABLISHED BY LAW"; of course it cannot extend to the appointments of senators, whose appointments are OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR in the Constitution[2], and who are ESTABLISHED BY THE CONSTITUTION, and will not require a future establishment by law.
Nor did the other's frank, clear eyes waver beneath D'Arnot's fixed gaze.
On this course nine obstacles had been arranged: the stream, a big and solid barrier five feet high, just before the pavilion, a dry ditch, a ditch full of water, a precipitous slope, an Irish barricade (one of the most difficult obstacles, consisting of a mound fenced with brushwood, beyond which was a ditch out of sight for the horses, so that the horse had to clear both obstacles or might be killed); then two more ditches filled with water, and one dry one; and the end of the race was just facing the pavilion.