clerihew


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clerihew

a form of comic or satiric verse, consisting of two couplets of metrically irregular lines, containing the name of a well-known person
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The clerihew was invented around 1890 by Edmund Clerihew Bentley (1875-1956).
I used the original and the parody whenever I discussed the clerihew in class or at literary parties.
He was 16 and a pupil at St Paul's School in London when he first started writing clerihews as a diversion from schoolwork.
The book is a collection of clerihews he's written "to make people smile".
Like the limerick, the clerihew is indigenous to the English language.
Epstein's clerihew, like Auden's, has the polish of the professional poet, and runs as follows:
The clerihew, a surprisingly versatile form, was invented by Edmund Clerihew Bently (1875-1956).
KHADIM HUSSAIN, of Middlesbrough (pictured), is the author of a new collection of poems called Clerihews.
Rollin Stearns' fine article on clerihews in this issue reintroduces the term to new readers.
The poem can be found in Wilson's Night Thoughts (Farrar, Straus & Cudahy), a curious collection of anagrams, limericks, clerihews, and whimsical excursions that should be on every logophile's bookshelf.
The topics include limericks, clerihews, and alphabet sentences, among other things.
RED, WHITE AND BLUE CLERIHEWS (with one atrocious sight rhyme) Eric the Red Discovered America, it's said (Or was it the other one, His son?