clerk

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clerk

1. clerk to the justices (in England) a legally qualified person who sits in court with lay justices to advise them on points of law
2. an employee of a court, legislature, board, corporation, etc., who keeps records and accounts, etc.
3. Brit a senior official of the House of Commons
4. a cleric
5. US and Canadian short for salesclerk
6. Archaic a scholar
References in classic literature ?
This envelope had the air of an official record of some period long past, when clerks engrossed their stiff and formal chirography on more substantial materials than at present.
I suppose, sir,' said I, still desiring to spare my aunt, 'that it is not the custom here, if an articled clerk were particularly useful, and made himself a perfect master of his profession' - I could not help blushing, this looked so like praising myself - 'I suppose it is not the custom, in the later years of his time, to allow him any -'
I began to say that I hoped I was not interrupting - when the clerk shoved this gentleman out with as little ceremony as I ever saw used, and tossing his fur cap out after him, left me alone.
In all, three clerks and a half, which, for the time, argued a very extensive clientage.
I SERVED Edward as his second clerk faithfully, punctually, diligently.
Colbert, destined for trade, had been clerk in Lyons to a merchant, whom he had quitted to come to Paris in the office of a Chatelet procureur named Biterne.
The latter, however, were completely on the alert; just as M'Kenzie's canoes were about to push off, they were joined by a couple from the Northwest squadron, in which was M'Tavish, with two clerks, and eleven men.
Thirdly, for that that concerns clerks and ministers.
Presently a clerk came in and then another; they glanced at Philip and in an undertone asked the office-boy (Philip found his name was Macdougal) who he was.
In those branches of administration which the king did not himself direct, such for instance as the "fermes" (the public domains throughout the country on which a revenue was levied), the clerks were to their superior what the clerks of a business-house are to their employer; they learned a science which would one day advance them to prosperity.
True," said the clerk, shrugging his shoulders; "and yet you are the better off.
In the ground-floor front of a dingy house, at the very farthest end of Freeman's Court, Cornhill, sat the four clerks of Messrs.