clickjacking

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clickjacking

A malicious action such as stealing confidential information that is perpetrated against a user who is browsing a website. The user is "hijacked" by "clicking" a link on a contaminated Web page that executes the malware. The buttons may appear legitimate, but users are actually clicking buttons on a transparent layer they cannot see. The buttons can cause anything to happen, including making a purchase.

Likejacking and Sharejacking
Numerous clickjacking scams have been perpetrated on Facebook. For example, Facebook Like and Share buttons have been hidden under other buttons so that, when clicked, users would voice their preference for something or share something with their friends unknowingly in order to generate viral marketing for a product or to propagate malware. See CSRF and hijacking.
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Some of their social media fraud methods include click-jacking, concealing hyperlinks beneath legitimate clickable content, doxing, publicly releasing a person's identifying information online without authorization, and pharming -- redirecting users from legitimate websites to fraudulent ones for the purpose of extracting confidential data.
Click-jacking, fake applications and social engineering are just some of the tactics used in order to deliver malware.
Growth in Android-based malware and social media scams such as click-jacking on Facebook and malicious links sent over Twitter are creating new and heightened levels of business vulnerability from data intrusion, theft and loss.
Some examples of malware particularly successful in social media are phishing, and click-jacking.
Click-jacking : Attackers lure you into clicking on a link, perhaps posting it on your wall and then spamming your friends to "check it out," or "view my photos.
Social network phishing and click-jacking attacks were the two most common types of attacks through social networks in 2010.
Employees innocently surfing dating sites via a mobile device or PC, that are in fact fake sites, or clicking on offers on Facebook such as a free McDonald's meal that are click-jacking scams, can have a catastrophic impact on data security, business continuity and profitability.