client


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client

1. a customer
2. a person who is registered with or receiving services or financial aid from a welfare agency
3. Computing a program or work station that requests data or information from a server

Client

The person or organization who has a need for a project; responsible for the overall financing of the work and directly or indirectly employs the entire design and building team.

client

[′klī·ənt]
(computer science)
A hardware or software entity that requests shared services from a server.

client

(programming)
A computer system or process that requests a service of another computer system or process (a "server") using some kind of protocol and accepts the server's responses. A client is part of a client-server software architecture.

For example, a workstation requesting the contents of a file from a file server is a client of the file server.

client

(1) A desktop computer, laptop, smartphone or tablet, as well as any other electronic device that sends or receives data from a server. The term implies a connection to a wired or wireless network. Contrast with server. See client application, client download, client/server, thin client and fat client.

(2) One end of the spectrum in a request/supply relationship between programs. See X Window and OLE.

(3) The customer of a vendor or consultant. The client of an IT department is the end user.




References in periodicals archive ?
David Gaino, CPA, managing shareholder of 90-person, 40-CPA Moore Stephens Apple in Akron, Ohio, says, "When a client isn't doing well, 60% of the time it's a people problem.
The objective is to ensure that departing partners take efforts to secure client transition and retention so they will receive the maximum purchase price.
Often, the firm's growth or reduction in client services drives the decision, usually making it unfair to both the client and the CPA to allow a poor fit to continue.
Thus, consistent with assumptions found in the metatheory of multicultural counseling and therapy (Sue, Ivey, & Pedersen, 1996), career intervention models for working with racial and ethnic minorities support the premise that counseling is more effective if the career counselor incorporates the life experiences, worldview, and multiple identities of the client into problem conceptualization and intervention planning.
The survey findings revealed consistent variations by ethnicity in both the quality of service delivery and in client perceptions of caseworker bias.
Lemon Grove has not stopped there and for the past three years has equipped students at one middle school with portable and wireless thin client devices with touch screen keyboards.
As Williams implies, the concept behind thin client computing is, at its core, reductionism on a large scale (see "Thin Clients: A History," page 25).
When engaged by a client, PRG-Schultz digs through more than 150 different financial categories, looking for potential savings.
Our people enable us to deliver on our mission "to stay slightly ahead of client needs.
If students who would benefit from counseling learn that the school counselor shared information without client consent, they may not seek the very services they need.
If the client is wheelchair-bound and resides in an older home or apartment, chances are he must maneuver through a narrow doorway in which some wheelchairs will not fit.
It is a straight forward way for both the client and the rehabilitation consultant to find out what it is going to take to compete successfully in today's labor market.