client

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client

1. a customer
2. a person who is registered with or receiving services or financial aid from a welfare agency
3. Computing a program or work station that requests data or information from a server

Client

The person or organization who has a need for a project; responsible for the overall financing of the work and directly or indirectly employs the entire design and building team.

client

[′klī·ənt]
(computer science)
A hardware or software entity that requests shared services from a server.

client

(programming)
A computer system or process that requests a service of another computer system or process (a "server") using some kind of protocol and accepts the server's responses. A client is part of a client-server software architecture.

For example, a workstation requesting the contents of a file from a file server is a client of the file server.

client

(1) A desktop computer, laptop, smartphone or tablet, as well as any other electronic device that sends or receives data from a server. The term implies a connection to a wired or wireless network. Contrast with server. See client application, client download, client/server, thin client and fat client.

(2) One end of the spectrum in a request/supply relationship between programs. See X Window and OLE.

(3) The customer of a vendor or consultant. The client of an IT department is the end user.




References in periodicals archive ?
Also, the fact that both are clientage systems makes infrastructure development particularly attractive to governing elites in both societies, but also more controversial and, in Nigeria, subject to more inconsistency, as rival elites seek to placate different clients in different areas of society.
15) Most seafaring men, Vickers suggests, did not hail from London, Bristol, or Boston, bur came from places such as Saleta, where bonds of custom, clientage, and family persisted, where a young man's time at sea was but one moment in a diverse occupational history, where coastal trips, as opposed to deep sea voyages, were the norm, and where land ownership and other pathways to self-sufficiency were still relatively open.
Malcolm Walsby provides a great deal of precise information on clientage that will deepen any general study of the subject.
Fifteenth-century English society was still marked by lordship, by the exercise of arbitrary and informal power through links of patronage and clientage.
Each of these Superiors came from families where women engaged in economic and clientage networks, a source of strength in trying times.
Thus Carroll examines in depth the rise of Guise power and its relationship to popular forces in political and religious society, in addition to his more traditional analysis of their influence and power through networks of clientage.
To an extent, the peasantry adapts to these changes through clientage with rural notables and through the acceptance born of helplessness in the face of the increasingly paltry benefits of state patronage.
At present Foundation Gas has over 400 distributors with clientage of 300,000 domestic and 8000 commercial consumers.
Imran Samad also mentioned the BOK Raast Islamic Banking Group is actively working on new Islamic Products and with the establishment of new Islamic Banking branches will further enhance its clientage.
Bilal Mustafa added the BOK Raast Islamic Banking Group is actively working on new Islamic Products and with the establishment of new Islamic Banking branches will further enhance its clientage.
A diversified clientage portfolio with telecommunications as its main area of expertise, but with customers in educational, residential, commercial, hospitality, IT, Aviation business, and Islamic Public Sector.
3) Terms such as patron, clientele, clientage, patron-client relationship, broker, brokerage, and clientelism have long since entered into common scholarly usage.