client

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client

1. a customer
2. a person who is registered with or receiving services or financial aid from a welfare agency
3. Computing a program or work station that requests data or information from a server

Client

The person or organization who has a need for a project; responsible for the overall financing of the work and directly or indirectly employs the entire design and building team.

client

[′klī·ənt]
(computer science)
A hardware or software entity that requests shared services from a server.

client

(programming)
A computer system or process that requests a service of another computer system or process (a "server") using some kind of protocol and accepts the server's responses. A client is part of a client-server software architecture.

For example, a workstation requesting the contents of a file from a file server is a client of the file server.

client

(1) A desktop computer, laptop, smartphone or tablet, as well as any other electronic device that sends or receives data from a server. The term implies a connection to a wired or wireless network. Contrast with server. See client application, client download, client/server, thin client and fat client.

(2) One end of the spectrum in a request/supply relationship between programs. See X Window and OLE.

(3) The customer of a vendor or consultant. The client of an IT department is the end user.




References in periodicals archive ?
In their truest sense, Angola and Nigeria are both rentier and clientage states that have received infrastructure loans and support from China in exchange for petroleum resources.
I do not doubt but I have had a longer, broader, and more active experience than any other woman at the bar, for I have had a large clientage and a busy and continuous practice for eighteen years.
10) WEBER, Alison: "Lope de Vega's rimas sacras: Conversion, Clientage, and the Performance of Masculinity", Publications of the Modern Languages Association of America, 120 (2005), pp.
Even McLean's final conclusion that the process of network building, of creating patronage ties "was a game that made Florentines into something like us, having been something unlike us previously" (229, emphasis McLean's) bears a resemblance to the thesis most often associated with Giorgio Chittolini: that the development of modernity, and the modern state in particular, owed a great deal to practices and behaviors that to twenty-first century eyes appear negative or regressive--nepotism, paternalism, institutionalized corruption, and, especially, patronage and clientage.
One of the things that strikes one reading these diaries is the predominance in the Blair years of courtier-like politics redolent of the baroque court of Louis XIV with its patronage and clientage.
Urban refugees from different ethnic groups did not have the resources, such as political clientage traditions, agricultural knowledge, and labour power, to negotiate with these actors and did not want to, and therefore addressed themselves to international actors and the state for aid by establishing a "spontaneous camp" in Thuo town.
These kleptocrats throw themselves at the feet of Western plutocracies: they spurn the real source of power -- their own people -- seeking clientage under Western boots.
Tuddenham had no direct ties to the peerage, but his association by marriage in the 1420s to the Wodehouse family brought him into contact with local magnates who were in turn tied to the nobility of Norfolk and Suffolk, including Thomas Beaufort, duke of Exeter, and the successor to Exeter's local clientage, William de la Pole.
On the other hand, the difference between patronage and friendship would be that patrons and clients forma voluntary or compulsory vertical association, in which some form of exchange is mandatory, while friendship is a horizontal and voluntary association in which barter or exchange is not a requisite (Kettering, Friendship and Clientage 145-46).
As participants in clientage, Cassiano--and in turn Poussin--as clients themselves, each owed their patron something in exchange for advancement and protection.
This clientage includes Textile/Spinning Mills, Flour Mills, Sports and Surgical Manufacturers, Garment Factories, Sugar Mills, Ghee Industries and various other industrial projects the number of which runs over fifteen thousand.