clinical pathology

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clinical pathology

[′klin·ə·kəl pə′thäl·ə·jē]
(pathology)
A medical specialty encompassing the diagnostic study of disease by means of laboratory tests of material from the living patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists have recognized medical consultancy as a key competency of clinical pathologists (22).
That the clinical pathologist shall attend the monthly staff conferences of the hospital.
It offers that the clinical pathologist will be paid P10,000 monthly as actual services to the city, and will be allowed to benefits enjoyed by regular government employees.
Rather than trying to force these competencies into the clinician-driven rubric of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) evaluation form, focusing on the above 8 skills will, in our opinion, provide a more balanced and accurate view of what a clinical pathologist should be learning during residency.
A clinical pathologist now retired from Venice General Hospital (Italy), Ortolani has assembled from a series of diagnostic notes a guide to one of the most difficult applications of flow cytometry, which requires both a good knowledge of hematopathology and good control of the technique.
To function effectively in this role, the clinical pathologist must be competent in leading the operation of the laboratory in all of the critical aspects enumerated in the proposed curriculum (1).
In this textbook on veterinary laboratory medicine meant for practicing veterinarians, students, clinical interns and residents, and pathology residents, Latimer, a veterinary clinical pathologist and retired professor of pathology at the U.
Statland spent his professional life as a clinical pathologist, clinical chemist, researcher, professor, government servant, and attorney.
Students are currently assigned to 1 of 4 conference groups and work with a designated anatomic pathologist and clinical pathologist for each group.
Your institution undoubtedly has an alert system in place that was developed by your clinical pathologist with the medical staff.
This leaves, again in my opinion, and I think I have proved it by the growth of our infusion center, many physicians in the community who need infusion services or services that can be provided in an infusion center that can be managed by pathology and, particularly, a clinical pathologist.

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