Clinker

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clinker

the ash and partially fused residues from a coal-fired furnace or fire

Clinker

 

the solid, sintered residue obtained after subjecting certain by-products of metallurgical production (for example, cakes, zinc-retort residues, or slags) and other zinc-containing products to the Waelz process.

The composition of the clinker depends on the composition of the original raw material. For example, clinker obtained by subjecting zinc cakes to the Waelz process contains 2.5–3 percent zinc, 1–3 percent lead, 1–3 percent copper, 10 g per ton gold, about 50 g per ton silver, 35–40 percent iron, and 20–30 percent carbon; the balance contains SiO2, CaO, and several other oxides. Clinker is an intermediate product of zinc manufacture. In copper or lead manufacture, copper, lead, and other valuable component elements are extracted by subsequent pyrometallurgical treatments. To separate copper concentrated in the magnetic clinker fraction, it is sometimes advisable to pulverize the clinker and to follow this step with magnetic separation.


Clinker

 

clay articles, usually brick-shaped, that are fired until they are completely sintered.

Clinker, made of highly plastic clays, is grouped with the stone-ceramic materials. It is used in paving highways, in facing hydraulic engineering structures, socles, and the facades of buildings, and in lining reservoirs in chemical manufacturing. The technology of clinkering is analogous to that of brick manufacture. A semifinished product of cement production that consists of a sintered mixture of limestone and clay (or slag) is also called clinker.

clinker

[′kliŋ·kər]
(geology)
Burnt or vitrified stony material, as ejected by a volcano or formed in a furnace.
(materials)
An overburned brick.

clinker

1. A partially fused product of a kiln, which is ground for use in cement; also called cement clinker.
2. A vitrified or partially vitrified residue of coal which has been burnt in a furnace; used as an aggregate in cinder block.
References in periodicals archive ?
The average heat requirements for clinkering blends with oil shale at 1300-1350[degrees]C are 3770 kJ/kg, therefore, additional heat of 1726 kJ/kg or 45% additional energy is needed.
This was achieved by performing energy balance on the clinkering process by dividing all processes into hypothetical paths and the changes in enthalpy were calculated for each of these paths.
Unlike the cement at those temperatures, the mentioned blend contains enough liquids to proceed with the clinkering reactions during the process of making cement.