cloning


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Related to cloning: Human cloning

cloning:

see cloneclone,
group of organisms, all of which are descended from a single individual through asexual reproduction, as in a pure cell culture of bacteria. Except for changes in the hereditary material that come about by mutation, all members of a clone are genetically identical.
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cloning

To make a product that functions like another. See clone. See also cloning software.
References in periodicals archive ?
gov/25020028) National Institutes of Health , for this type of cloning, also known as reproductive cloning, scientists remove a mature somatic cell (any type of cell, except a sperm or egg cell) from the animal the scientists wish to copy.
Hinrichs and other researchers not involved in the study hope the new report corrects the record on cloning and aging.
According to the Commission's impact assessment, requiring identification and traceability of such products would have equally negative effect on imports from countries where commercial cloning is currently most advanced (US, Canada, Argentina, New Zealand, Australia, Chile, China and South Korea).
We import even greater quantities of meat from countries such as Argentina and Brazil where cloning is also widespread.
The British government introduced legislation in order to allow licensed therapeutic cloning in a debate in January 2001 after an amendment to the Human Fertilization & Embryology Act 1990.
There are, indeed, major ethical and moral issues at the heart of the cloning debate.
In the US the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been studying the implications of farmyard cloning for six years.
Scott of the New York Times notes: "The issues raised by the possibility of human cloning are vexed in themselves, and they are also connected to more immediate debates about abortion, stem cells and euthanasia.
With the support of groups favoring research cloning, many states are considering (and some have passed) laws that allow placing cloned human embryos in women's wombs, but forbid any attempt to let them be born alive.
2001 - Great Britain becomes the first country to legalize therapeutic human cloning for research.
Bernard Siegel, head of the Genetics Policy Institute, a pro-therapeutic cloning lobby, declared victory, saying, "This is a very good result.
Leon Kass, the chairman of the President's Council on Bioethics and a cloning foe, would like to keep that a secret.