close studding


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close studding

Construction in which the studs are placed relatively close and the intervening spaces are plastered.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main property still retains many of its original features most notably some magnificent timber framing including close studding, a crossed beamed ceiling in the dining room and vaulted master bedroom with exposed cruck frame.
The gardens took two years to lay out in authentic period style and make a colourful backdrop to the fine timber framed house with its close studding.
There are clues to its early status in some lavish use of timber and the close studding of the oak structure, and it seems likely that long departed residents would still know their old home for its unspoilt and well-preserved living spaces.
Where 16th or 17th century predecessors might have indulged in close studding, Skeys allowed himself a grand entrance with tasteful portico and interesting, ornate fanlight.
It is Grade ll listed and thoroughly modernised now, its smart bright interiors in complete contrast to the classic facade with its lavish close studding, jettied first floor and photogenic black and white looks.
There is a riot of close studding in the timbered structure, nothing quite symmetrical, so obviously authentic.
The house holds onto much of its 16th century character, timber framed sections displaying some lavish close studding and interesting old interior features.
It was built in the vernacular style on a mighty sandstone plinth with some lavish, close studding, a clue to the wealth of its early owners.
The more timber used, the more impressive was the house and where there was money to pay for it, nothing could beat close studding or ornamental framing.
Dated to around 1650, it is mainly timber framed with impressive, close studding all standing on a sandstone plinth.
It is the front of the house that claims the Elizabethan roots and remarkable surviving features of close studding and photogenic quatrefoil detail to the dormers.
There is close studding for a herringbone pattern and intricate lozenge designs, rich, diverse and 'showing a marked aesthetic sense in the mind of the builder' noted Country Life magazine in 1933.