close-up


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close-up

a photograph or film or television shot taken at close range
References in periodicals archive ?
Just before the event and once the skating routine is over, the camera goes in for an extreme close-up showing every naked pore.
At its heart, this Hollywood Close-Ups success is the story of one man's entrepreneurial triumph, with enormous help from the teamwork of a terrific staff of 8 (known as the heavy-hitting 8-ballers), led by the company's one-two punch Sheehan's 25-year friend and colleague, editor par excellence and audio mixing artist John F.
Bookbinder admitted the close-ups of children's private parts could be a turn-on for perverts.
Close-ups rob the viewer of the wider game, replays are always shown at the expense of the live action.
Nobody had ever seen that before, the close-ups of the action, the sweat flying off.
Along with standard concert-film footage of singers vocalizing and violinists sawing away, Klein gives us close-ups of the soloists, alternately beautiful and grotesque (the facial effort required to project the meaning of the words isn't always pretty).
Elsewhere, Leaves Structure, 1974, arranges close-ups of fallen foliage in a composite pattern so that the figure/ground relation is obscured and no seams between the shots are visible.
Hanks, who was Oscar-nominated for best actor for his role as Jim Lovell in the film, was also impressed with the format but jokingly commented that while the film's action scenes play well on the bigger screen, his concern was the close-ups where ``a pimple could be the size of a Volkswagen'' or an errant strand of co-star Bill Paxton's hair ``could look like a Lincoln Log.
Panoramic views of the empty theater alternate with close-ups of the director seated in the orchestra section as he directs the actors--that is, creates fictitious subjectivities.
For picture-perfect close-ups there's also a Macro mode that allows picture taking as close as 3.
But the tell-tale signs of its TV origins remain - short scenes, dramatic close-ups, episodic plot threads and seemingly prominent characters that disappear without a trace.
For example, use close-ups of different features of a child such as the hands, feet, and eyes.