cloth


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Related to cloth: man of the cloth

cloth

1. 
a. a fabric formed by weaving, felting or knitting wool, cotton, etc.
b. (as modifier): a cloth bag
2. a piece of such fabric used for a particular purpose, as for a dishcloth
3. 
a. the clothes worn by a clergyman
b. the clergy
4. Nautical any of the panels of a sail
5. Chiefly Brit a piece of coloured fabric, used on the stage as scenery

cloth

[klȯth]
(textiles)
A sheet of fibers assembled by weaving, knitting, felting, or some other similar process.
A nonfibrous material of similar properties.
References in classic literature ?
Here,' drawing the cloth off with great pride and care, 'are two pieces of furniture to commence with.
On the right shoulder of the mantle there was cut, in white cloth, a cross of a peculiar form.
Everybody in the whole town knew what a wonderful power the cloth had, and they were all curious to see how bad or how stupid their neighbour was.
But when we least thought it was going to rain any more cianis from that quarter, we saw the reed suddenly appear with another cloth tied in a larger knot attached to it, and this at a time when, as on the former occasion, the bano was deserted and unoccupied.
Then I thought that the man I had just seen had been clothed in bluish cloth, had not been naked as a savage would have been; and I tried to persuade myself from that fact that he was after all probably a peaceful character, that the dull ferocity of his countenance belied him.
It was covered with a lace cloth and draped with green wreaths.
This appeared to give them a little confidence, so I approached nearer, presenting the cloth with one hand, and holding the bough with the other, while they slowly retreated.
Benares struck him as a peculiarly filthy city, though it was pleasant to find how his cloth was respected.
By Saint Dunstan," quoth he, "I had nigh forgot that quarter-day cometh on apace, and yet no cloth of Lincoln green in all our store.
I'll see you later," he added, and summoned de Beausset, who by that time had prepared the surprise, having placed something on the chairs and covered it with a cloth.
It was a little book in blue cloth, and there were some mild wood- cuts in it.
The fairies sit round on mushrooms, and at first they are very well-behaved and always cough off the table, and so on, but after a bit they are not so well-behaved and stick their fingers into the butter, which is got from the roots of old trees, and the really horrid ones crawl over the table- cloth chasing sugar or other delicacies with their tongues.