cloud band

cloud band

[′klau̇d ‚band]
(meteorology)
A broad band of clouds, about 10 to 100 or more miles (16 to 160 kilometers) wide, and varying in length from a few tens of miles to hundreds of miles.
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The nearest cloud band of the depression was spotted 460km off the coast of Oman overlooking the Arabian Sea, according to the latest weather maps and satellite images of the Directorate General of Meteorology of Oman 9pm Tuesday.
The result was a broad, but still shallow, middle cloud band offering as much as 80% cloud cover across the country which is equally rare.
With its enormous cloud band, the slow-moving typhoon drenched the northern part of the Philippines with rain for days before pummeling the area with fierce winds, setting off landslides and floods and knocking down walls, the cause of the majority of casualties in that country, said Benito Ramos, who heads the Office of Civil Defense.
Backhouse (1842-1920) noted a small silvery cloud band in the twilight sky.
and it's set to get even worse; TOUR: Mr Blair in York; ON WAY: Satellite cloud band
The potential of middle air advection has also been improved (with no cold front/troughs to deflect such inflow) so a persistent cloud band has appeared, somewhat narrowly, across our skies circulating around a shallow, but also persistent, middle air anticyclonic core above mid-continent.
With its enormous cloud band, the typhoon drenched northern provinces with rains for days before pummeling them with fierce winds, setting off landslides and floods and knocking down walls that left at least eight people dead and six more missing, said Benito Ramos, who heads the Office of Civil Defence.
The equatorial cloud band is prominent during Ls = 50-145[degrees], but its full extent across the disk is only clearly seen in blue light.
and their colleagues, reveal bright, high-altitude cloud features, including a cloud band in the northern hemisphere.
This is unusual for our time of year perhaps, but this can account for the development of seemingly convective cloud band identifiable from Angola to our southeast.
An Equatorial Cloud Band (ECB) was reported from about 2000 Dec 12 (Ls = 88[degrees]) till 2001 Apr 14 (145[degrees]).
Beard's group thinks the high water content of the cloud band near Hilo contributes to the unexpectedly high number of large drops.