cloud classification

cloud classification

[′klau̇d ‚klas·ə·fə′kā·shən]
(meteorology)
A scheme of distinguishing and grouping clouds according to their appearance and, where possible, to their process of formation.
A scheme of classifying clouds according to their altitudes: high, middle, or low clouds.
A scheme of classifying clouds according to their particulate composition: water clouds, ice-crystal clouds, or mixed clouds.

cloud classification

cloud classificationclick for a larger image
cloud classificationclick for a larger image
Cloud classification.
Clouds can be classified either according to their form (i.e., cirrus, cumulus, and stratus) or their height (low, medium, and high clouds). The height of low clouds varies from 0 up to 6500 ft (2 km); medium clouds from 6500 to 13,000 ft (2–4 km) in polar regions and up to 20,000 ft (6 km) in temperate and tropical regions; and high clouds from 10,000 up to 25,000 ft (3–8 km) in polar regions and 20,000 up to 60,000 ft (6–18 or 19 km) in equatorial regions. The basic cloud forms are cirrocumulus, cirrostratus, cirrus, cumulus, stratus, and stratocumulus. These may be prefixed by alto if they exist above their normal level. Nimbus is a suffix often given to the rain-bearing clouds.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the 150th anniversary of the death of cloud classification pioneer Luke Howard, whose fascination with the skies lead him to create the system of cloud naming still used today.
The contract is for service of execution of airborne laser scanning and the development and delivery to the Purchaser after the point cloud classification, digital terrain model, the numerical model of land cover and aerial images of color.
Scientific basis and initial evaluation of the CLAVR-1 global clear cloud classification algorithm for the advanced very high resolution radiometer, Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 16: 656-681.
In addition, new 3D point cloud classification capabilities increase productivity and enhance usability throughout corridor mapping and survey workflows.
British amateur weatherman Luke Howard was the first person to devise a cloud classification system in 1803.